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[QLD] LMR 2 storeys 3 storeys

Discussion in 'Development' started by clubman, 8th Sep, 2016.

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  1. clubman

    clubman Member

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    The council allows you to build up to 3 stories when the site is 400m walking distance to railway / bus station, or 200m walk to shops.

    Does anyone know how exactly this is calculated? What if the closest point of the shopping centre is a wall or something not accessible?

    Could I ask if anyone has experience with the council about this? Is the council flexible with the 400m / 200m?

    image3.png image4.png
     
  2. LJW

    LJW Member

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    Just to clarify, Within the LMR2 Zone, Council allows you to build Multiple Dwellings to 3 storeys where within 400m walking distance of a "dedicated public pedestrian access point of a railway or busway station" only. You are confusing the 200m/Centre rule with subdivisions.

    Walking distance is illustrated in the images above. "Dedicated public pedestrian access point" is not defined by City Plan 2014 so is open to interpretation.
     
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  3. RPI

    RPI Property Lawyer, Town Planner Business Member

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    Council is absolutely not flexible at all.

    Pedestrian entry to pedestrian entry is it. If close will often need surveyors certificate confirming.
     
  4. LJW

    LJW Member

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    What I meant was the definition of pedestrian entry i.e "dedicated public pedestrian access point" is an undefined term that is open to interpretation. Using Wynnum North Railway Station as an example, you could potentially argue that the "dedicated pedestrian access point" is measured at the start of the dedicated pedestrian pathway at Selina Street which leads to the station?

    Alternatively, you could argue that the pedestrian entry is the point at which you enter the railway station land? i.e. ticket machines. Or you could argue that the entry is when you physically arrive on the platform.

    In many cases, it is not clear where the pedestrian access point of a railway station is, and as far as I'm aware, this has not yet been tested by Council.
     
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  5. Christina46

    Christina46 Active Member

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    You're looking in my neck of the woods @LJW.

    I've looked at some properties close to that train station. Rule of thumb I've used is that if the 200m does not make it onto the coloured "block" on the PDonline map overlays then I've assumed it wouldn't meet the requirement... I'm not a planner though.
     
  6. LJW

    LJW Member

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    The 200m calculation (relating to subdivisions) is easier to work out as you measure to the nearest front boundary of the centre. However, the 400m rule (relating to Multiple Dwellings - 2/3 storeys, Code/Impact) is not so straight forward as the pedestrian entrance of a railway/busway is not clearly defined.

    FYI, I subdivided the site at cnr of Selina St/Stanley St last year and it was pretty profitable.
     
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  7. RetireRich101

    RetireRich101 Well-Known Member

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    For the 200m from 2000m2 centre rule, I previously saw BCC examples suggesting as long as the it "touches" the 2000m2 district centre, it doesn't have to be the front entrance and it could be the rear that don't have access. However I think you need to measure from the front of the house though..

    I had a sneak peak of your work. nicely done..