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Kitchen ceiling paint peeling off

Discussion in 'Repairs & Maintenance' started by ATANG, 17th Aug, 2015.

  1. ATANG

    ATANG Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know why my part of my kitchen ceiling paint kept peeling off itself? It's doing it gradually. It's right above where gas stove and kitchen sink is at. I know my kitchen is located in the middle of the floorplan, hence it doesn't have a window, only relies on the rangehood to do the oil sucking... Do you think it's the smoke and heat and moisture that cause the paint to peel off? What can i do about it? Is there some kind of portable exhaust fan? or smth that can absorb the kitchen smell, smoke?
     
  2. bob shovel

    bob shovel Well-Known Member

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    Is it an old house? I had paint peeling off, in kitchen, lounge and bathroom. House just under 40 years old. I believe it was from the paint and lack of primer used when it was originally painted.
    It was flakey and coming off back to the bare gyprock.

    Got a photo?
     
  3. ATANG

    ATANG Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it's an old character house with high ceiling but it was renovated so I think the paint is probably around 10 years old.
     

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  4. Propertunity

    Propertunity Exclusive Real Estate Buyers Agent Business Member

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    Paint is only good for about 10 years anyway. Your ceiling is above 2 x moisture sources - the sink and gas cooker (when you burn gas one of the byproducts is water vapour).

    You need to scrape back, seal with a good primer and repaint. A semi-gloss oil based enamel would probably last longest in this environment.

    An exhaust fan that vents to the outside would probably help too.
     
  5. DaveM

    DaveM Adelaide Buyers Agent & KFC Strategist Business Member

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    +1 to Propertunity.

    Also its common for this to happen when the ceiling is not prepped properly. Either they dont wash it down and paint over a greasy surface, or paint water based over an existing oil based (water doesnt stick to oil).
     
  6. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't recommend using enamel on a ceiling. Acrylic will be fine.

    Get the prep work right, scrape back all loose and flaking paint.
     
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  7. Chilliblue

    Chilliblue Well-Known Member

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    @Propertunity is right but you can also get an acrylic paint that can deal with the moisture.
     
  8. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    Just be careful sanding and scraping. That strapping makes me think you could have an asbestos ceiling.
     
  9. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    No Wylie. That ceiling is horsehair and plaster. If it were fibro, they wouldn't have dressed it up.
     
  10. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    Be aware if you sand it back but you can't get it all, it will look fairly ordinary when you paint it, especially with gloss. If moisture has gotten in, you might need to replace the gyprock.
     
  11. DaveM

    DaveM Adelaide Buyers Agent & KFC Strategist Business Member

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    Skim coating the ceiling is way easier than replacing the gyprock due to flaking paint. You can also feather edges with topping compound or cornice cement.
     
    Last edited: 18th Aug, 2015
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  12. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    What is this skim coating you speak of?
    (I said if moisture has gotten in)
     
  13. Coota9

    Coota9 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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  14. ATANG

    ATANG Well-Known Member

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    Okay you guys have lost me... Now what even asbestos is coming?? :(

    What should I do? Is it something I can fix myself or just leave it? Or get someone to come and look at it?
     
  15. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    There's no shame in asking someone to come and give you a quote.
     
  16. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    What do you mean by "dressed it up"?
    I think the strapping could indicate asbestos. If not... Great.
    I would look at resheeting it with new plaster if it is horsehair plaster.

    We have had similar issues and they can take more time and money fixing an old problem (moisture, never sealed on installation) than replacing.
     
  17. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    The style of the finishing of the ceiling is of a style that dates the house as pre-1930's ie plaster blocks and beads over joins in the sheets. You simply wouldn't do that treatment to AC sheeting as 'H' mould would have been used.

    A few additional gyprock screws would be all that's necessary to flatten any sagging sections.

    A flat plasterboard ceiling would be more serviceable and could solve the problems but would be more expensive and involves more trades. Unless the ceiling is unsound it's not worth replacement if all itneeds is a lick of paint.