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Granny Flat in Canterbury LGA

Discussion in 'Development' started by jacks0n, 5th Sep, 2016.

  1. jacks0n

    jacks0n New Member

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    I'm investigating buying a property that I want to construct a granny flat on. The market is quite hot at the moment so everything is on auction and short time frame campaigns. Just wondering whether one should be engaging a granny flat company before bidding/securing a property, just to be overcautious/safe, or to just know the rules yourself and make an assessment?

    E.g. - I know the basics: Setbacks, 12m Building Width, Min 450m2 (this is all via the SEPP not Council). But I would have no idea about investigating depth and location of sewer, services, etc.

    Also how can one know the EXACT site measurements/width? I have a plan which shows exactly 12m across, but what if in reality it is 11.95m, will they allow it? Do I get a tape measure out fence to fence ? (fences may not be built on the true boundary)? I checked aerial photos but I know this can't be the most accurate method. How strict is all this? Just need to be careful I don't end up buying something then can't do what I want to on the block!

    Also the site I am looking at has a large 10m tall tree, it's not a noxious weed and it's not a native. So not sure if the council does not allow it to be cut down, how close the GF can be built to it, or what the likelihood is that they will allow it to be removed?

    Appreciate any guidance :)
     
  2. neK

    neK Well-Known Member

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    Check your land size is 449sqm. Because that may actually rule you out as silly as it seems.

    Also check the zoning before you build the granny flat. You will generally be allowed, but it may not be worth it.

    A fair chunk of Canterbury LGA has been rezoned R3 - so it would be waste if you on a prime site as you wouldnt get any extra money for the GF build.
     
  3. jacks0n

    jacks0n New Member

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    Thanks for the reply neK. I thought if you are relying on the SEPP (and not the LGA rules), you can build a GF regardless of zoning (I'm assuming provided it is some form of Resi zoning and not industrial or something crazy...)?

    Also, this property is actually zoned R4. It's under 500m2 though. The R4 zoning is highly desirable but what can you do in R4 with such a small block? You can't subdivide (torrens). Are you thinking highest and best use would be to demolish and build some form of units? I would think this block size would be too small to allow for anything decent? Unless you buy it and wait for next door to come up for sale (if ever, and you are very lucky).

    The current house is old and rundown, it could do with a a reno, and then would rent for maybe $500pw. Building a GF out the back will rent for $400pw. So could achieve $900pw on a ~850k spend. 5.5% yield - not great but combined with CG potential could be good?
     
  4. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Amalgamation with an adjoining block would be the best way forward - a gf would be a cost to any future developer and reduce value not increase.

    Council's zoning has indicated that the area is high density & if the blocks adjoining are built in isolation of your block you will be left with an undevelopable parcel of land.
     
    Observer likes this.
  5. neK

    neK Well-Known Member

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    You are correct in what you say.

    What I am saying, is if you have an R4 which allows you to have a much higher FSR, why would you waste it on a Granny Flat.

    I am pro granny flats, but i would not be building a granny flat on a site that allowed me to build 4 or more dwellings.

    And as @Scott No Mates says, amalgamation with the block next door is the best way forward.

    I would be spending the time speaking to the neighbours to try and sell and cash in on some bigger bucks. That way you can divert the funds else where (eg buying two sites and putting granny flats on those). :)
     
    Propertunity likes this.
  6. Propertunity

    Propertunity Exclusive Real Estate Buyers Agent Business Member

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    Yeah, building a granny flat on an R4 zoned site is not the "highest & best use".
     
    neK likes this.