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Girl get suspended from school for speaking the truth.

Discussion in 'Living Room' started by Ace in the Hole, 1st Jul, 2015.

  1. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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  2. Peter_Tersteeg

    Peter_Tersteeg Finance broker and strategist Business Member

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    More like she's an ignorant spoilt brat. If she doesn't have a fundamental understanding of mathematics she'll never get anywhere in any sort of science, engineering or technical field, or just about anything else other than basic manual labour. She'll even have trouble applying for that home loan she thinks she'll need.

    Looking back on my year 10 level education, I can confidently say that almost all of it has seen some practical application in my life. Basic statistics, creative and analytical writing, understanding the periodic table, basic biology, mapping mathematics to business rules, these are all things we use every day without even thinking about it. A lot of this is taught around years 9 & 10.
     
    Last edited: 1st Jul, 2015
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  3. EN710

    EN710 Well-Known Member

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    She got critical thinking, that's a plus.
    Most people don't need to know advance mathematics unless they want to be in the field that needs one, HOWEVER, the point is not about knowing what a= 1+rn is. It's about understanding logics.
     
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  4. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Unless your job/career requires complex calculations, year 7 maths is more than enough to do extremely well in the real world.
     
  5. MichaelW

    MichaelW Well-Known Member

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    Wow, so she doesn't believe that math or biology are important. "Just tell me how to mortgage my house!" Try starting with some entry level math: budgeting, IRR, compounding effects perhaps...

    And her orchard worker father agrees with her 100%. Ah well, at least she can just come to Australia as planned if it all gets too hard in NZ, there's plenty of orchards over here that need manual labour too!!...

    So much I could say about that article, really really biting my tongue...
     
  6. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The girl's in year 10, don't think she's unaware.
    I'm backing her because I know my real learning did not occur in school, but when I got away from it.
     
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  7. MichaelW

    MichaelW Well-Known Member

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    Fair enough, but never underestimate the value of a solid foundation in formal education. Its only 18 years, commit then make your own way in the world...
     
  8. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I agree that fundamentals are important, but after that, anything goes.
    Horses for courses really.
    If one wants to genuinely learn, they will find a way, whether it's formal or informal learning.
    Informal is generally a much faster way to learn if you are disciplined and interested in the subject matter.
    The problem with school is, you don't really get much choice on the subject matter...
     
  9. Peter_Tersteeg

    Peter_Tersteeg Finance broker and strategist Business Member

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    Practical example of year 10 math on this forum. Big Will's thread, "Median Rent", https://propertychat.com.au/community/threads/meidan-rent-vic.803/

    "Median" is a statistical term which is introduced roughly at year 9 or 10 level in mathematics. It's quite useful to understand its meaning if you're trying to analyse the figures for your next investment purchase. "Median rent" is not the same as "Average rent". Within certain contexts, the two can be very different. If you understand the difference and how it's applied within different real world scenarios, you're more likely to make a better investment decision.

    The real learning that people use every day is built on the foundation of what they learnt in years 9 & 10. I agree that years 11 & 12 are more specialised, but year 10 education is extremely fundamental.
     
  10. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The thing with current day is, Google and YouTube are the best teachers of all, and information is instant these days.
    Learning methods are not what they used to be.
    Don't have to sit in a classroom to learn a new term or meaning.

    It's the application of information which counts most...as the information is free for all.
     
  11. keithj

    keithj Moderator Staff Member

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    What choices will she have at end of Y12 ?
     
  12. freyja

    freyja Well-Known Member

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    I value free speech, critical thinking and assertiveness and encourage it in my children. I also value cooperation, respect and tact. The method this girl chose had none of the latter and I doubt she will get very far in life without it. If it were my child, I'd be disappointed. There are other productive ways she could have dealt with her concerns - with a better outcome, I'm sure. I think this speech highlights the girl's lack of maturity and shows she has a LOT to learn...I know 12 year olds who get it - it's a bit of a worry if you haven't got it by year 10.
     
    Last edited: 1st Jul, 2015
  13. Random Username

    Random Username Well-Known Member

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    Wow, what makes you think that??

    Why is that?

    Maybe she just wants to be a landlord, you don't have to be very bright to be one of them.
     
  14. MTR

    MTR Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    ... But have I missed something she is speaking the truth, it may have touched a raw nerve..

    Teachers in public system don't get the sack regardless how bad or lazy they are, they may get transferred to another school, so the immediate problem goes away. Anyone know about this one???

    I am sure there are some great teachers around, but from my experience hard to find because the system is flawed and as a consequence the children are the ones who end up with the raw deal.

    MTR:)
     
    Last edited: 1st Jul, 2015
  15. MTR

    MTR Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Absolutely:)
     
  16. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    The girl got skills, she knows how to get attention.
    Nobody gonna get big success acting in obscurity.
    I see potential.
     
  17. Francesco

    Francesco Well-Known Member

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    The girl will be assertive in voicing her opinions, an admirable trait required in many high paying, high visibility professions.

    However, in some day to day interactions she will be lost, a baby alone in the forest! If she does not take the trouble to go a bit out of her comfort zone, to learn a bit more, there will be a time when she will be duped and 'slugged', but no one will bother to come to her aid!:oops:
     
  18. BLAIR_

    BLAIR_ Member

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    Maybe the whole schooling system is outdated and in need of revision. Theres alot of new technology out there as you say ace, and some of this should be implented into the schooling program.
     
  19. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    I don't think there has been a single generation that felt any different to this girl.

    Most kids simply put up with it and soldier on, get through to the end and go on to a productive life, or drop out as soon as they can, get a job, apprenticeship or other, and go from there..

    Some embrace it all and run with it - they are the really academically minded no doubt. Good luck to them.

    I think the whole system needs a rethink.

    I loved Ancient History, and was pretty good at it, but it's effectively useless in real life - just interesting, is all.

    Economics is useful; but how do you make it interesting for a 14 year old? There's the trick.

    I think she is sorta correct - there needs to be a lot more loud voice from students , parents and even teachers to ever get the curriculums to change more towards subjects which are more useful in life.

    Still have the useless subjects - but make them more an elective component, rather than compulsory.
     
  20. geoffw

    geoffw Moderator Staff Member

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    I think a big part of learning like mathematics at lower secondary school isn't so much the direct application of principles, but the develpoment of problem solving ability, which is hugely important. If she is throwing up her hands now because she can't see the usefulness (itself a problem) I don't like her chances at the really hard problems in life.