Bricks vs Cladding for upstairs on a double story house

Discussion in 'What to buy' started by Rowa, 23rd Dec, 2019.

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  1. Rowa

    Rowa Member

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    Hi,

    I signed up for a house & land package with a volume builder last week.

    The land is in Clyde and will build a double story house.

    Downstairs it is going to be brick, but I heard on the upstairs it will be cladding.

    I have build a double story house before with another volume builder, but it is brick veneer.

    I am just wondering whether it would be stable with cladding in upstairs.

    Could you please advise your thoughts.
     
  2. The Y-man

    The Y-man Moderator Staff Member

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    I heard from a builder friend of mine that using cladding upstairs means less stress (weights) on the lower level brickwork so can be better for issues such as ground movement etc. Of course it also can be a lot more cost effective too.

    The Y-man
     
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  3. Rowa

    Rowa Member

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    Yes, I had the feeling that the builder mentioned this due to cost effectiveness, but due to the marketing perspective said that it would cost even more compared to bricks, but they can finish the house quicker as cladding is done by another team.

    I am still wondering whether I should ask for Bricks on upstairs walls. When we asked for the cost, sales lady mentioned it will probably the same, but I have a feeling when it is inquired at the studio, they will probably add couple of thousands.
     
  4. Kelvin Cunnington

    Kelvin Cunnington Well-Known Member

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    We built a double storey house back in 1991 with styrene foam batts on the frame, and then rendered for the upper storey, and bricks with render for the bottom storey.
    So, the entire house looks like the same thing.
    The reason was to save a lot of cost in engineering, steel etc.
    We sold it a few years later, I went past that same house about 3 weeks ago, and it still looks in very good condition.
    My only criticism about cladding for the second storey and bricks for the bottom storey is I dont particularly like the two different finishes - but thats a personal taste.
    I like a lot of the modern houses and townhouses where they use a bit of an "eclectic" combination and positioning of different finishes and colours though. Weird.
     
  5. Shahin_Afarin

    Shahin_Afarin Residential and Commercial Broker Business Member

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    Stable yes however consider the resale value depending on the demographics in your area. Some demographics hate cladding even the new James Hardie products so talk to a couple of agents and see what they say.
     
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  6. Rowa

    Rowa Member

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    that's a good point. I will speak to a real estate agent of the area & ask about the reselling value.
     
  7. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    [
    In Melbourne, it will be almost certainly a brick veneer lower storey. As brick veneer is a cladding only and not structural, it does not support the upper storey at all.

    Drive through any new estate and you can see what I mean. The roof is actually supported by the wooden framing.

    Only after the frame is constructed is the cladding added (whether brick, or hebel or weatherboard or styrene etc). The bricks on the ground floor provide no strength to the upper storey in brick veneer.
     
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  8. Rowa

    Rowa Member

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    Yes, the property in Melbourne South eastern, in Clyde.

    So you recon the lower storey has to be brick veneer and it does not matter what is on upper storey?
     
  9. Rowa

    Rowa Member

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    This is one of the finished products of the same builder.

    This is how it looks like.. Cladding.JPG
     
  10. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    No, I meant that in Melbourne the type of cladding does not affect the structural strength.

    The choice is largely aesthetic - except for cases where there are positive energy saving considerations (I.e. some cladding like hebel is a bit more energy efficient than others).

    One consideration is that lightweight cladding is often based on polystyrene. Very good for keeping heat out/in. Not so good in a fire!

    Although the Victorian building commission FAQs specifically mention that this type of cladding is fine for town houses, I wonder if regs will tighten in future - even for low rise builds?

    Choose the cladding based on what you like/can afford and what is usual in the area.
     
  11. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Which has the better thermal performance? Are you just looking at construction cost or the cost savings of a more thermally efficient building?

    What glazing and insulation options are they offering?

    Is the slab on styrene?

    Are you adding solar, heat pump or other measures?
     
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  12. datto

    datto Well-Known Member

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    I'd go brick up top. To me cladding up top looks cheap and even if it's made to look like brick it just doesn't cut it.

    When selling, all will be exposed. I'd be knocking 15K off the asking price straight off the bat if the top floor ain't brick. I'd probably smoke the tyres out front in protest as well lol.
     
  13. balwoges

    balwoges Well-Known Member

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    IMHO would also do brick, turns me off a house when the upstairs looks like an add-on and they always do ... :(
     
  14. Sackie

    Sackie Well-known cafe bum of the East Premium Member

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    Totally depends on the demographic and what is expected in the area. Doesnt matter what you or anyone here likes. Its irrelevant to your build. I would look at what is expected, established and in demand for the area you are building and go with similar.

    In sydney i would go double brick bottom and brick veneer on top for many areas. Perth i hear is mostly double brick. Brisbane i do all light weight and it sells well with less costs.

    All depends on the specific area and what is expected.
     
    Last edited: 24th Dec, 2019
  15. The Y-man

    The Y-man Moderator Staff Member

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    Anywhere with poly panels bottom and brick on top? :D

    The Y-man
     
  16. Sackie

    Sackie Well-known cafe bum of the East Premium Member

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    China maybe :p
     
  17. The Y-man

    The Y-man Moderator Staff Member

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    Just had a thought: would rising damp be easier to deal with / a non-issue for the cladding downstairs?

    The Y-man
     
  18. FKS

    FKS Active Member

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    Brick to the upper storey will likely be more expensive if the house is not 'box on box'. If the upper storey brickwork has no lower storey brickwork to sit on, structural steel will be required to support the upper storey brickwork.

    Have you considered Hebel for upper storey construction?