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Blinds or Curtains?

Discussion in 'Styling & Decorating' started by Simon Hampel, 19th Aug, 2015.

  1. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    I have bought and installed these 250cm ones from Spotlight (well, the pencil pleated version) to good effect.

    I always choose curtains with pull cords. Easy to replace the cords DIY if required. However, the cords last for decades and it makes sure the curtains stay clean.

    Also bought some great pinch pleat curtains from Harris Scarfe for the IP.

    In Melbourne, it really is better to have curtains in winter. The IP has curtains in the living rooms and blinds in the bedrooms.

    For the living room, which has a six metre expanse of window, I just joined two sets together using the sewing machine. Six meters of thick curtains for just $240.

    I think it is a bit much expecting tenants to buy thermal curtains, that's the landlord's responsibility in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: 11th Jun, 2016
  2. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    Whatever you do, keep the yellow glass. It's timeless.
     
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  3. Casteller

    Casteller Well-Known Member

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    I have combo of curtains (with metal rings for easy drawing) and aluminium shutters (popular in Spain). When the shutters are down 100% light blackout, cant see your hand in front of your face, great for sleeping in the day.

    Tenant does everything here I installed curtains (and rods), light fittings and even the toilet seat in place I rented.
     
  4. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    In Japan the tenant brings their own stove to apartments! When I shared houses in NZ the fridge was always supplied by the landlord. Might not be the case now though.
     
  5. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    I've replace the toilet seat in a few places that I've been renting.
    Maybe a high flow shower head here and there too.
     
  6. sanj

    sanj Well-Known Member

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    Looks and cost are of course important but so is practicality. I assume this is the living room, are the window treatments needed for privacy, light filtering or aesthetic reasons?

    I have no idea what, where or how expensive rhis property is but those floors and that ceiling means there are so many possibilities
     
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  7. Beelzebub

    Beelzebub Well-Known Member

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    Go to Spotlight and get some white timber Venetians. They can even cut them to size for you. WIll look awesome.
     
  8. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like a good idea.
    They often have big sales on blinds and curtains.
     
  9. markson

    markson Well-Known Member

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    Thanks mate. They would look nice. That's the problem with being interstate either I fork out a **** load and pay someone to do it. Or I have to fly up there source and install them myself o_O
     
  10. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hijack this thread, but this seemed the best thread to post to. I have about six sets of block-out curtains (drapes?) in an IP where the stitching is coming out at the top of the curtains. They no longer hook into the pulley on the rail, so need restitching. The curtain fabric is thick, so I doubt a sewing machine could be used, and as the property is tenanted, I'd need to remove, restitch and rehang them on the same day.

    Am I best to just restitch them by hand using a strong thread or can I take them to someone who does clothing alterations to repair?
     
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  11. SueA

    SueA Well-Known Member

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    One IP had pvc blinds, the ones that get sunlight were melting, even though quite thick blades. The timber ones I have at home that get the sun have faded badly. As front of house will be replacing with verticals . IP got verticals.
     

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  12. WattleIdo

    WattleIdo rentvestor Premium Member

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    If you think you can do it yourself, go for it. Depends how tough it is to pull through the fabric. Gets harder with a thicker needle but you probably need a decent darning needle and good quality thread. Why not ring a real curtain place and ask hem what kind of thread to use. Are you neat?
     
  13. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    I am a seasoned curtain maker, so may be able to advise.

    Firstly, what type of heading? I mean are they pencil pleat, pinch pleat or something else?

    Pinch pleat is where the top has a three-fold pleat sewed in, pencil pleats are created by sewing a length of curtain tape to the top of the curtain and pulling draw cords which run through the tape from the end to create the folds.

    If the latter, it may just be the curtain tape that is coming unstitched?

    Usually a sewing machine is used, with the stitch length set to the longest length or just under depending on the thickness.

    If it is the pleats in a pinch pleat curtain coming undone, then you can use either a machine or hand sewing.

    A photo would be helpful.
     
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  14. Jacque

    Jacque Buyers Agent and Bookworm, Sydney Business Member

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    I'd go the venetians route or tab-top or eyelet curtains as per @wylie's suggestion. Far easier, usually cheaper than rollers and longer lasting. My mum is handy and added extra fabric hems to standard size drops in one of our places that had high windows. The good thing about these types of curtains are they are easy to wash (no hooks or prongs to worry about) and change between tenants as required. Good luck Sim!
     
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  15. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin Well-Known Member

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    Thank you WattleIdo and Joynz. I'm at work now but will attach a photo tomorrow and try to work out the type of heading (pleats).
     
  16. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    Good on you for having a go.
    How hard could it be?
     
  17. VB King

    VB King Well-Known Member

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    I'm voting for curtains. Even the dirtiest tenant, you throw the curtains in the machine & hang up again as clean and near new.

    Blinds would be a personal preference for a PPOR, but too many moving parts / pieces that can be ruined which renders the entire window / door treatment as U/S.
     
  18. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin Well-Known Member

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    @Joynz , they're triple pleat curtains, with the machine stitching coming undone on the heading. Some of the pleats will need redoing too, so definitely not something to do by hand (about ten curtains need repair). I'll get looking for someone in Melbourne's south who can restitch them in a day, so the tenants have them that night.
    IMG_2822.JPG IMG_2833.JPG IMG_2834.JPG IMG_2841.JPG
     
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  19. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    Just so you know, this is an easy job. Just a bit fiddly and time-consuming. Curtains can be heavy and awkward.

    To rebuild each pleat requires three lines of stitching (though it looks like some of these may have only two). (All stitching needs to be finished by sewing in place or going back and forward a few stitches to secure the stitching):

    0. Match thread.
    1. Unpick the pleat if required.
    2. Fold along the vertical stitching line. Pin (or Tailor's Tack) the vertical stitching line in place if required. For this type of thing, just holding it in place could be fine).
    3. Sew the vertical line ( usually about 8 cm ) along the original stitching line.
    4. Pinch the pleat along the original folds.
    5. Tack or pin the horizontal stitching lines.
    6. Sew the horizontal lines (usually about 1.5 cm each). Important to finish the thread off correctly so the seam holds. I double stitch too.
     
    Last edited: 18th Jun, 2016
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  20. Pumpkin

    Pumpkin Well-Known Member

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    I have just bought curtains for a tenant. They already have blockout vertical blinds (I dont like them) which are installed inside the frame. So light still "sipped" thru and they wanted total blackout and asked for curtains, since there is existing tracks and pelmet.
    If it is my property, give me curtains anytime. Not the thick heavy blackout ones, but lighter and maybe double-track.
    Have too many issues with blinds: cleaning, breaking, chains, pullcord. And the bracket on top looks so industrial! Aarrrghhh!
     
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