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Wind Turbines

Discussion in 'General Property Chat' started by Depreciator, 7th Oct, 2016.

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  1. Depreciator

    Depreciator Moderator Staff Member

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  2. Terry_w

    Terry_w Solicitor, Finance Broker, CTA Business Member

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    Amazing. Would love to set one up. Wonder what the costs are.
     
  3. Depreciator

    Depreciator Moderator Staff Member

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    They would be expensive - just out of the prototype stage, I guess.
    But all that stuff will come down in cost as solar panels have.
     
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  4. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    I just love driving down the Hume and seeing the banks of turbines on the horizon - it p!$$es off the greenies as it affects the migration patterns of the low flying two headed hooting bat. We want green energy, let them build it. Plenty of scientific studies have debunked the effects of EMF or low frequency vibrations produced by these installations, it doesn't put the cows off their milk, cause the curtains to fade etc, the real issue is the jealosy of the adjoining property owners who have missed out on the lucrative income generated by leasing a few hundred m2 of land for just as much as their annual rural production is worth.

    There are plenty of small systems available to homeowners - they have shown a few on Grand Designs UK (a failed horizontal turbine) but technology has again improved.
     
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  5. wobbycarly

    wobbycarly Well-Known Member

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    The shire buildings in Torquay (Victoria) have a single turbine on the roof.

    https://www.google.com.au/maps/@-38...4!1sPBYW4HF1Ntn4dZbgcBn_Sw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    A couple of years ago the wind got too strong one day and twisted into a pretzel, and it didn't spin for several months. I often wonder how much it cost originally, how much it cost to repair, and honestly how much power it generates, given that often there is little wind in the area until afternoon. Most mornings I go past it, it's not moving at all. More interested in being SEEN to be "doing something" than ACTUALLY doing something.

    (In fact, in this picture, I think it's still broken!)
     
  6. Waldo

    Waldo Well-Known Member

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    The amount of power they generate seems extremely insignificant.

    My only question is what takes the baseload power when it isnt windy enough or its too windy (plus the clouds are blocking the sun). Are we willing to pay extra for the base load powerstation that sits on standby until it is suddenly required due to environmental factors?

    Agreed ..... the way of the future
     
  7. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Most of the alternative sources are little bang for your buck but also cost alot less over time. I recently inspected the Keiwa Valley Hydro Scheme - produces an insignificant amount of power but it goes from zero to full power in no time vs baseload which needs to get up to temp before it can produce anything.
     
  8. Xjas

    Xjas Active Member

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    Once the home battery banks really take off I think the solar and wind will be a lot more viable but until then we still unfortunately need the base load coal stations.
    Interestingly a few years back I did some work out at Norfolk Island, the guys who look after the power house (large diesel generators that supply power to the whole island) were telling me that when the large majority of the island added solar panels they started having maintenance issues with the diesels because of the rapid load changes when the clouds would come over.
    Looks like we're going to see these issues on a much larger scale as the states push for more wind/solar.
     
  9. Waldo

    Waldo Well-Known Member

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    Hydo power is possibly the exception - can provide baseload power (generally) and can produce large scale power.
     
  10. TadhgMor

    TadhgMor Well-Known Member

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  11. LibGS

    LibGS Well-Known Member

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    Helix wind, who are now out of business, produced a beautiful vertical axis wind turbine. It looks like a work of art.

     
  12. LibGS

    LibGS Well-Known Member

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    How do you store energy when you have an excess of it, is the fundamental question. One excellent solution is pumped hydro.

    You have 2 dams at different heights and using wind, solar or even nuclear, you pump water from the lower dam to the upper one. The upper dam turns hydro generators and the water spills into the lower dam. Repeat as required. So when the wind is blowing or sun is shining you are charging the battery (upper dam). You now have on demand power that is very easy to adjust and tune to meet grid demand.

    I'm against nuclear power because of safety issues, but this is an excellent application. A low capacity nuclear power station runs and constantly powers the pumps. There is no stuffing around with adjusting the power levels to meet demand, it is basically on or off, which makes it much simpler and safer to construct and operate.

    Here is an example of an new project that will reuse existing mining infrastructure.

    Pumped hydro storage could breathe new life into old mines - Australian Renewable Energy Agency
     
    Last edited: 11th Oct, 2016
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