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Why would you be a Cop???

Discussion in 'Living Room' started by Bayview, 21st Jan, 2016.

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  1. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    Two firefighters had no idea this Police Officer was wearing a camera

    Unfortunately; this is becoming a regular occurance for Police around the world now.

    Shows on tv about the lives of cops in their day to day job; and the disrespect they have to endure all day long - as well as the threat of physical harm and being slandered, accused of brutality and "excessive force" etc also illustrate what they have to put up with.

    It's amazing; everyone is straight on the phone calling for cops to help them when they are in trouble, but deem it ok to destroy a cops career or attack them physically if things don't go the way that suits them.

    Luckily this cop had a camera on his person to record these two losers - otherwise he could have had his career ended with dishonour.

    Rant over.
     
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  2. geoffw

    geoffw Moderator Staff Member

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    That is in the US.

    But police officers can and do get accused of many things.

    In Canberra every single complaint is treated seriously and investigated properly. Although it is by another member of the police the investigations are thorough and impartial. Even those coming from serial complainers. Police members have had action taken against them when a complaint is upheld, but as you might expect, the majority don't stand up to scrutiny.

    A policeman investigating his colleagues is not a popular person.
     
  3. Lizzie

    Lizzie Well-Known Member

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    As a youngster in high school I desperately wanted to be a cop ... fortunately my mother talked me out of it ... I'm the type of person that, if I knew someone was guilty but couldn't prove it, I'd potentially manufacture evidence ... wish she'd pushed me towards interior design, which was my second love, instead of Law
     
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  4. jaybean

    jaybean Well-Known Member

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    Wait, how would you avoid that problem by going into law?
     
  5. Lizzie

    Lizzie Well-Known Member

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    ... well ... wasn't interested in the law as such ...:D
     
  6. 2FAST4U

    2FAST4U Well-Known Member

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    Being a cop wouldn’t be that bad. It’s got great job security and above-average pay. It would really depend what kind of Department you’re in as well. For example I would hate to be a traffic cop, but I would love to do investigative work or Narcotics etc. Recently the SA Government has decided they want affirmative action for females in the SA police force. Subsequently a 50/50 quota intake will occur. Unfortunately, I think this will result in a fall in standards as a lot more males aspire to be cops than females. Plus to the nature of the job it’s just going to result in a lot more females being police housecats. People will always complain about police revenue raising, but generally policing is still seen as a fairly noble/respectable career.
     
  7. Alex2003

    Alex2003 Member

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    Oh I really don't want to bite, but as a female cop I am desperate to know what a "police housecat" is? :)
     
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  8. jaybean

    jaybean Well-Known Member

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    I may need your services one day.
     
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  9. 2FAST4U

    2FAST4U Well-Known Member

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    It’s a term from the USA for police that just sit in offices all day and applies to both males and females. They’re not civilians their actual police, but they as well be civilians since they never go out on the streets. :)
     
  10. wategos

    wategos Well-Known Member

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    Regarding cops in the US, most are fine but some of them are extremely trigger happy and dangerous, hundreds of people are killed by them every year, far more dangerous than the hyped up "terrorist" threat. I know someone who had a gun pulled on them simply for getting out of their car when pulled over. Be very careful around them, don't make sudden movements, tell them before you move or do anything, act the same as you would if being held up at gunpoint by a criminal.
     
  11. pinkboy

    pinkboy Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Having been on the receiving end of several cops with their weapons drawn, I can tell you this is VERY true. DO NOT MOVE A MUSCLE UNLESS ASKED - THEY WILL SHOOT YOU! :eek:

    #practicaljokegonewrong

    pinkboy
     
  12. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    Why do you think this attitude amongst Cops is there?

    How Many Cops Die in the Line of Duty Each Year?

    When a Police Officer requests that you remain in the car, and if the driver/passenger or both then disobey that request and get out of the car; the Cop is going to assume there might be trouble for him/her - possible endangerment to his/her life.

    It is the same as you saw in that video I posted; the female moved around behind the Cop; his first instinct is to protect himself from possible threat thus he asked her to move out of the way and back where he could see her.

    She decided to argue back, and show attitude, so he then threatened to put her in his Police car if she did not comply. This is fair enough I reckon.

    This couple had already put themselves in a bad situation by showing attitude towards the Cop from the very first minute of him speaking to them..there is no need to start off talking to any Cop - or any person for that matter - with that type of attitude; especially if you are in the wrong and are hoping for a bit of sympathy and "a bit of a good break".
     
  13. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    In what circumstances would you have been in the proximity of police where they needed to draw their weapon?

    I'm 54 years old, and have had a few speeding tickets over the years (none in the last decade at least), and have so far not had a run-in with any cop....be respectful; cop yer punishment on the chin for stuffing up, and life is good...I have actually been let off a few speeding fines by simply being a decent person and treating the cop well - they are humans too.

    Start to "act up a bit" and give some attitude; the outcome is usually different.

    Not saying you have acted up; but why the drawn revolvers? :confused:

    Wouldn't it be fair to say that if a cop has had to draw his weapon; he/she is of the opinion that there is a high level of threat to their safety?

    If this was the case; I would expect that a sudden move might be a bad idea, and to disobey a request might be a bad idea...but folks still do it, and then we hear the Civ Libs crying on the teev about how the cops are pigs, and thugs, and over-reacted and so on.
     
    Last edited: 21st Jan, 2016
  14. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    Most cops start off at the bottom (traffic and general "beat patrol") and then move up to the more "glamourous" departments after a few years of experience, extra training and aptitude etc.

    Their hours are terrible, so what looks to be not that bad might actually be not that good...a lot of cops commit suicide and their divorce rate is very high.

    I don't get this mentality of 50/50.

    It is creeping into Aus politics discussions I've noticed, and various other industries are talking about it as well. o_O

    It's PC BS.

    Look; I'm all for women doing whatever job they like, and good luck to them if they get to the very top of the career positions available.

    But; to consciously work towards having a 50/50 split of women to men just for the sake of being PC and all kumbaya hold hands and have a love-in; what if the current crop of women applicants for these positions are not up to the task?

    Are they still gunna take the lesser qualified woman over the more qualified and experienced man; just to fill a quota?

    It is a dumb idea; but I wouldn't put it past our Gubbmint to pass a law about it.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: 21st Jan, 2016
  15. Ed Barton

    Ed Barton Well-Known Member

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    I think you should move to North Korea.
     
  16. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    Have a look at the "Jesse Stone" series (Tom Selleck); a fair bit of "manufacturing of evidence" in that bloke....mostly he sets them up a makes them fall by his own hand....perfect. ;)
     
  17. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

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    :confused:

    What is the relevance of North Korea to this?
     
  18. Ed Barton

    Ed Barton Well-Known Member

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    Because you want cops to be judge, jury and executioner.

    QLD cops have improved from the days when they would bash people for sport, but they still have a long way to go. I think it's part training and mostly culture. Vic cops seem a lot better.
     
  19. Tim & Chrissy

    Tim & Chrissy Well-Known Member

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    Our shameful silence on police suicide
     
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  20. 2FAST4U

    2FAST4U Well-Known Member

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    Completely agree. It’s inevitable that less component females will be selected over component males just due to the numbers game. The majority of police applications are from males, and this is reflected in the current recruitment. Say you have 1000 applications and have 50 positions to fill. Currently you might have 800 applications from males and 200 from females. Ordinarily if you chose along a merit based system, all things being equal you’d expect to have 40 males and 10 females chosen for the positions. Once quotas are introduced you’ll still have a similar amount of applications, although it is possible that more females will decide to apply since they know they’ve got a higher chance of getting recruited. However, once again using our example we have 1000 applicants for 50 positions. This time only 25 positions can go to males, whilst 25 have to go to females. So the 15 females that previously couldn’t make the cut now get offered a position. On the other hand they replace the 15 males that were chosen over them. No doubt the PC correct crowd would say I’m being sexist, but in reality it’s just basic maths!

    Here's the article:

    No Cookies | The Advertiser

    MORE female officers will fight crime under an ambitious SA Police recruitment plan to address gender imbalance within the force.

    Police Commissioner Grant Stevens has revealed a commitment to recruit equal numbers of men and women from next month. Employment figures show females have represented less than 30 per cent of the state’s sworn police officers for several years.

    SA will be the first state and the second jurisdiction to adopt 50-50 recruitment, after the Northern Territory announced the initiative in October.

    Mr Stevens said the changes would be introduced to ensure police better represented the community it served.

    “I am confident this quota can be achieved without dropping standards,” he said.

    “I am pleased that SAPOL has a large number of dedicated, professional female officers, but we can do better.

    “This gender balance will be more representative given the community is about 50.8 per cent female and 49.2 per cent male. The benefits of achieving a gender balanced recruitment process are many and include fairness, opportunity and enhanced organisational performance.”

    Figures in the SA Police 2014-15 annual report show the number of male employees is almost double the number of females in the 6012-strong force. There were 3976 male employees compared with 2036 female employees at June 30 this year.

    But the disparity is even greater among sworn police, with males comprising more than 70 per cent of the 4817 officers. Police have recruited 116 cadets — 80 men and 36 women — so far this calendar year.

    Mr Stevens said SA Police had a proud tradition of recognising female officers. He said the plan would ensure gender equality in internal committees, working groups and specialist and officer courses.

    “Earlier this month we commemorated 100 years of women in policing in South Australia, so I believe this is a fitting time for us to continue to move forward with a modern and inclusive approach to gender equality,” he said.

    SA appointed its first female officers — Miss Kate Cocks and Miss Annie Ross — as equals, with equal pay, to their male counterparts on December 1, 1915.

    They were the first female police officers commissioned in the then British Empire and among the first in the world.

    In May this year, Deputy Commissioner Linda Williams was the first female appointed to the role in South Australia.

    SA Equal Opportunity Commissioner Anne Gale said the commitment by Mr Stevens was “a very strong message that he is serious about improving gender equality in SAPOL”.

    “Setting a 50-50 recruitment quota will significantly increase the ‘pipeline’ of future female leaders,” she said.

    “This is a very significant step toward increasing gender equality in SAPOL.”

    Police Minister Tony Piccolo welcomed the plan.

    “In the year we are celebrating the centenary of women in our police force, this is an important initiative that reflects the make up of our community and society,” he said.

    Status of Women Minister Gail Gago said it was fitting that SA was the first state police force to introduce the plan given its proud history of pioneering women’s rights.

    “I welcome any initiative that encourages a greater participation by women in what has traditionally been a male-dominated field,” she said.

    “It’s also great to see our new Police Commissioner hitting the ground running, in the gender equality space.”

    SA Police sworn officers

    2010-11: 4718, with 3502 males (74.2 per cent), 1216 females (25.8 per cent)

    2011-12: 4832, with 3552 males (73.5 per cent), 1280 females (26.5 per cent)

    2012-13: 4779, with 3497 males (73.2 per cent), 1282 females (26.8 per cent)

    2013-14: 4827, with 3516 males (72.8 per cent), 1311 females (27.2 per cent)

    2014-15: 4817, with 3492 males (72.5 per cent), 1325 females (27.5 per cent)

    * Source: SA Police annual reports