Which plants/landscaping for this front garden?

Discussion in 'Landscaping' started by Joynz, 14th Jul, 2019.

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  1. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    BD77F6D5-72A5-42ED-8558-F97E6B794122.jpeg Hi

    Wanting to plant a few shrubs or similar against the right hand fence. Any other suggestions for the bed in front of the steps?

    Under the fence, there was the same spiky grass as under the right hand window - but couch grass from the neighbouring property kept taking over, even with a thick layer of mulch. Impossible to keep it under control - so removed it.

    Whatever goes in next has to be able to be sprayed with weedkiller around the base when the grass comes back - so perhaps upright shrubs or similar (no ground covers as the grass just grows through and over the top...).
     
  2. Angel

    Angel Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I would be treating the neighbour's grass with some old car oil, kerosene, creosote or similar.

    Not as evil as it sounds - paint it along the base of the fence, getting fully underneath the fence. Say a six inch band of the stuff. That should slow down progress and after a few months, the clear dirt stripe at the base of the fence may show the neighbour you are serious.

    On my side, I would reapply any spare paint, oil, whatever would otherwise be taken to the tip, maybe twice a year until nothing and I mean nothing will grow there again, ever.

    Set a base of concrete 450 to 600 wide, 100mm high, all along the section where you currently have a garden bed. Once cured, you can position pots of whatever you like on the concrete.

    Some more pavers and concrete, a few tall white columns near the stairs, and all of Melbourne will know you are a gardener not to be messed with.

    Sorry, couldn't help myself
     
  3. Angel

    Angel Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Seriously now:
    I find Rosemary is pretty indestructible. I'm also visualising those slender pencil pines, but I have never grown any myself so I don't know how hardy they are. You can hand paint weedkiller on the couch being careful not to touch the trunks.
     
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  4. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Angel.

    This is an IP so it needs to be a bit more low care than painting on round up - I definitely do that at my own place though.

    I did consider cumquats or ficus. Though a colour consultant suggested sticking with a grey/green colour scheme due to the brick colour.
     
  5. Angel

    Angel Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    What if you go there once a year to apply the weed killer yourself?
    And I think cumquats would look great
     
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  6. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    I'd recommend a Cottonwood Hibiscus along the fence line. You can trim the bottom branches so you can spray their grass if you need to. It's fast growing bushy/hedgy or tree like depending how you trim (and once a year is fine or not at all). It has green and purple leaves with a yellow flower

    Comes in a variety of sizes but you probably want this size if it's going to be somewhat neglected at an IP Our Range | The Widest Range of Tools, Lighting & Gardening Products

    This is a picture of a specimen that's probably about 2yrs old along a fence

    [​IMG]

    For the bed in front of the steps maybe a Murraya (orange blossom) as it's shrubby with a white flower that can be quite easily maintained. Or just some more of the Cottonwood but kept more pruned
     
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  7. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone - great suggestions.
     
  8. Mel Morgan

    Mel Morgan Sydney Property Manager Business Member

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    Last edited: 16th Jul, 2019 at 10:10 AM
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  9. WattleIdo

    WattleIdo midas touch

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    There are some really beautiful callistemon (bottle brush). They come in all different heights so maybe one that gets to about 2m - they can be grey green and often have soft leaves these days . If you plant all the same kind in a row, it looks great. 8d04f871669980b72f9cda67a15bc906.jpg

    Actually, I didn't see until you posted it how that brick cries out for grey-green but now I get it. I like it myself because it's drought resistant and tough. I like the colour of @Westminster 's suggestion too, which I think works with the brick.
    I guess this looks good. fg2.jpg


    What is the aspect?
    The yukas provide some green which I think is a must.
    Pencil pines are extremely hardy and the best one is probably Glauca, which is also grey green. They can be planted anywhere because they don't have invasive roots. A more 'traditional' look I suppose but my gut feeling is that pencil pines are about to make a come back. Not sure if Melbourne is hot and dry enough for them though. An added bonus is that they tend to kill off most plants around their base, including grass don't quote me on that. cup-semp-glauca-min-wfnfbqyzikqg.jpg
    Other blue-grey die-hards are lavendar, rosemary, westringa. And snow pears if you want a tree. I love snow pears and have planted heaps of them. Although they need full sun, they secretly prefer a bit of shade, as long as the light is very good.
    There's also a blue salt bush but that might be taking things too far and maybe not suited to Melbourne.
    Then, of course, there are olives.
    jpegs 635.9908f68d.jpg French-Lavender-Citrus-Trees.jpg
     
    Last edited: 15th Jul, 2019 at 9:24 PM
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  10. BarneyRubble

    BarneyRubble Well-Known Member

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    Lily pills. Fast growing, low water demand, and almost indestructible.
     
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