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Unsafe houses

Discussion in 'General Property Chat' started by moridog, 8th Mar, 2016.

  1. moridog

    moridog Well-Known Member

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    I heard today that a relative had passed away, quite young. He had been living in a very dilapidated house, the owner would kindly drive him to the bank once a fortnight to collect the rent, his health had declined dramatically over the past year and he had previously been receiving home help support. The co ordinator told him several months ago they could not longer provide this home help due to the state of dilapidation of the house, which meant under OSH legislation, it was unsafe.
    I work in the community and have seen a rise in the amount of my clients, who are over 65, living in houses which are to all intents and purposes, absolutely unsafe, not to mention unsanitary, unhygienic, and just bloody shocking. I understand the rentals are low which makes them attractive to people on low incomes but just wondered whether private renters had any comeback, there is never any PM, lease etc and these people are vulnerable, I am not saying the tenants would complain, they would not, but certainly shows a systems failure, ie, my relative, who was under 60 was admitted to hospital several times over the past month and despite being close to death, was discharged back to this environment on each occasion except this one where he was so close to death they were forced to keep him. Not suggesting it is just landlords who may not be doing the righty, for some of my clients it is also the computer repair guy, tv repairers and a range of other individuals.
     
  2. bob shovel

    bob shovel Well-Known Member

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    I've heard of the hospitals keeping patients as they can't return them to their house due to the state it's in for the patients safety. They are then stuck in hospital till a bed is made available in a nursing home or care of some sort. Or a relative discharges them
    There are government assessors that go out and check the person's condition plus the house and maintenance. acats?? But they need to be made aware of these people in the first place, a family member or friend arranging it or, after its to late once they are hurt or sick and in hospital.

    The state and area probably plays a big part too,with what services available. Regional hospitals usually have "permanent patients", pretty much a nursing home for them till a bed becomes free nearby
     
  3. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    Interesting. I'm surprised the carer did not report it to the health section of the local council. If reported, they would have inspected it and if found that it doesn't meet the Health Act or is unsafe they will place an order on the dwelling to be rectified within xx days and/or fined.

    I have a dwelling that was reported for it's dereliction and believe me that council department is VERY thorough. It was made very clear that the property did not meet standards to be rented out and needed to be rectified or boarded up.
     
  4. moridog

    moridog Well-Known Member

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    You're right Bob, if an elderly person breaks a hip or similar, the hospital will ensure that the house is safe before returning them although I know of many occasions where the house has been inspected and the person returned despite the risks inherent. My relative was too young for an ACAT and would not have co operated anyway, despite clear evidence of declining capacity. The relatives were not asked if alternative accomodation was available and would not have taken him in anyway. You're right too Westminster, the service provider could not have reported the premises to anyone, merely withdrawn the services. I guess the issue is that these premises will simply get re let, via word of mouth or similar. I remember last year the City of Bayswater raiding a house in Embleton and finding about thirty people living there, not the same I know but goes to show the councils are on the ball, mainly.