Tile roof needs repairing

Discussion in 'Renovation & Home Improvement' started by Burramys, 13th Oct, 2022.

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  1. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    My PPOR was built 40-45 years ago, slab, brick veneer, tile roof, nothing special. In the last week there's been some wild weather, much rain and wind. I noticed that cement in a roof hip had fallen out, and managed to patch this between showers. This needs to be done professionally. It would cost less to have the missing bits on all hips and ridges fixed, but should all the joints be replaced? While I want to make the place waterproof, I don't want to spend more than necessary.
     
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  2. Rolf Latham

    Rolf Latham Inciteful (sic) Staff Member Business Plus Member

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    repointing all the ridge line is better value in the long run than patch work.

    if one segment has failed, others will soon follow.

    ta
    rolf
     
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  3. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    Rolf, thanks. I'm quite careful with spending, but when it counts I'll spend what it takes. Also, my focus is invariably on the long term. For the roof, paying more now means no water damage from a leaking roof over the long term.
     
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  4. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    I'm getting quotes, which include no show, just a price (no details) and a lot of details. The last bloke showed me pictures of cracked tiles, chips and general roof unhappiness. I'm persuaded that he's right - the roof is on the way out and that a new roof is indicated. The brochure mentioned Colorbond. The tile roof makes the house quite hot in summer, and I'm thinking of a metal roof, Colorbond or similar. Can someone please advise me of the pros and cons of tiles and metal, especially regarding heat? A light colour may be better in summer.
     
  5. paulF

    paulF Well-Known Member

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    Same situation here a year or so ago, major storm in Melbourne and ended up with a massive hole in the roof due to wind lifting around 10 tiles ... The ridge pointings have failed at some point, I think it was due to the earthquake that hit Melbourne and the house is pretty old too ...

    Luckily, no tiles were broken so got a local roofer to just put them back and silicon things for a quick repair and then got him to repoint the whole ridge. Cost around 700$ from memory.
     
  6. willair

    willair Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    With the Colorbond,and depending on the quality of the insulation used plus the set-up of ventilation would be a vast temp difference from tiles ..
    Plus once a Colorbond roof is set then apart from storms -cyclones -floods ect in my opinion -Colorbond is bulletproof..
     
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  7. paulF

    paulF Well-Known Member

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    Does Council need to approve a colorbond roof?
     
  8. Paul@PAS

    Paul@PAS Tax, Accounting + SMSF + All things Property Tax Business Plus Member

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    Ask council. Some councils and land title (developer land) have rules and covenants that limit materials. But a reroof without structural changes to roofing itself may be OK. In know in my LGA colourbond is restricted and gables etc are required. You cant put a steel standard pitch in and low pitch roofing must be hidden. Colours must be OK too. eg No black and dark colours.

    Colourbond has some benefits for later solar install. Tiles tend to get broken etc.
     
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  9. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I've asked the roof company about permits. The company sounds pretty good, and the bloke today took more time on the roof than any other person. He took several dozen pictures, very thorough. I'm thinking of a lighter shade, or, for those of a certain age, A whiter shade of pale.
     
  10. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    I'm still getting quotes for the metal roof. One estimate was $60,000. The roof is about 200 square metres, flat site, good access. After the roof is installed I'm having solar panels installed. Is it necessary, desirable or practical to have the solar panel supports installed with the metal roof?
     
  11. Stoffo

    Stoffo Well-Known Member

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    Colorbond seems to be the prefered option these days

    Several of my (soon to be former) neighbors have recently changed from tile to colorbond.
    They are all original owners who had their houses built and are the owners who cheaper out and went with cement tiles to save a dollar, others spent the money and went with terracotta/glazed tiles (and apart from some repointing) these look great still 40 years on !

    It will help to reflect more heat.
    One of the neighbors was getting their roof replaced last week, they have cathedral ceilings yet went with a black roof :confused: NUTS ! (Some councils won't let you put on a dark roof these days as it can raise your home temperature and increase your cooling costs).
    They will attach the brackets using the existing screw holes
    Just take a LOT of pics of your roof once complete/prior to solar installation, if or when they crease a sheet or two you will have proof and a claim for sheet replacement.

    When they replace the battons (different spacing for tin) ensure that you get the sarking with the added insulation
     
  12. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    Stoffo, thanks, a useful reply. I cannot understand why anyone would get a black roof. Crazy! I think that Colorbond costs more than tiles to install, and over time the cost is less. Colorbond is cooler, and with global warming probably present, renovations to mitigate the impact of heat are advised.

    Thanks for that advice - I had not considered pictures. I have walked on tiles many times. Is it safe to walk on Colorbond?

    At this stage I'm getting estimates for just the roof. When I have a short list I'll get quotes with insulation.
     
  13. Stoffo

    Stoffo Well-Known Member

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    It should be part of the colorbond installation (Just like the battons), they should be doing sparking regardless but the one with insulation is just an extra for not much more.

    I've never understood HOW colorbond is the same price or more !
    It is far quicker to install, uses less battons, lighter and easier to transport also.

    The manufacturing process is so refined now even a small scratch can cause it to start to degrade (and imho the tin/iron is much thinner than it used to be, so easily dented).

    Zincalume was the original and looks better on period era homes
     
  14. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    Getting these quotes is a bit like skinning an onion – there's another layer underneath. This started as replacing hips, $3000 or so, and now it's the whole roof, 10 times that.

    Taking longer to get quotes is paying off. One bloke was too busy, said it would be around $60,000. This is for a 200 square metre roof on a three bedroom house.

    The following are for tiles off, Colorbond on, new valley irons and insulation.
    Company AA one vent …...................… $38,200
    Company BB one vent …...................… $29,100
    Company CC, vent not cited …..........… $25,850

    The last one has two extras not in the above price:
    - Replace gutters and downpipes …......... $4120
    - Colorbond fascia over existing fascia …. $1880
    This comes to $29,970 for the roof and gutters, and $31,850 if the fascias are done

    The house is about 40 years old and the gutters are a bit wonky. Three of the four downpipes are broken, functional, and cosmetically unappealing. The gutters and downpipes will need to be replaced at some stage. The fascias are metal and seem to be in good condition, pretty solid, so I'm tending to not having them replaced.

    Company CC has the best roof price, well under the other two, 32 and 11 per cent lower for the roof only. I'm happy with CC. It may be that access for the gutters is easier with the roof off. Given that the CC roof amount is 11 per cent less than the next highest price, it may be that there's no need to look for further gutter and downpipe prices. CC is a kilometre away, possibly leading to a lower price than the others which are more distant..

    Is one vent adequate? Is there any advantage in having the gutters replaced at the same time as the roof? Is the $4120 amount reasonable?

    The colour theme for the house is brown – gutters, fascias, tiles, some doors, door frames, insect screens. I've painted the door frames white, much nicer. I want a light colour for the roof, better in summer. The same light colour for the gutters would contrast the existing fascias. Is this okay?
     
  15. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    The consensus is that two vents are adequate, with replacement air seeping in at the edges. I've been in the ceiling cavity and looked at the rafters, which seem to be okay. I did not inspect the battens. As the metal weight is a fraction of the tile weight, the battens should be okay. I'm tending towards wait and see if the battens need replacing. The local council said that a permit is not needed, saves $650. A few parts will be checked next week, with a total of around $26,000.

    Edit: Forgot to ask about the colour. I want a light color, but am unsure if there's much thermal difference between the lighter shades, Dover white, Surf mist, and Classic cream. The rest are probably a bit dark.
     
    Last edited: 17th Dec, 2022
  16. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    I think you are wasting your money replacing a roof just because there is some pointing to be done and some chipped tiles.

    There a lot of bs talked about ‘worn out tiles’ by contractors who want to replace your roof. Do your research independently!

    A couple (even several) whirlybirds do not provide a lot of air changes compared to a powered extraction fan. Get the extraction rate and compare!

    Just because they are turning around doesn’t mean they are that efficient!

    Note: I have colourbond on my home and tiles on my IP.
     
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  17. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    The roof is 40+ years old, with bits of cement and tiles falling off. One contractor took pictures of some tiles showing cracks, nearing or beyond the end of their useful life. There were leaks before and after I bought the house. While the amount for a Colorbond roof is significant, I can afford it. The house will be more watertight, with less maintenance, and cooler in summer. If the whirlybirds do not work then I'll add an extraction fan later. As the ceiling cavity heats, hot air will rise and escape.

    Advice about the best colour would be valued.
     
  18. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    If you are determined to do it and cooling is your priority, then go for the lightest colour - surfmist.

    In a metal roof, a lot of the radiant heat can be deflected by reflective foil sarking (which also deals with moisture from condensation). Make sure the installer laps and tapes it properly and ends it at the gutters as per manufacturers instructions.

    I recommend that you get anticon blanket - e.g. produced by Bradford (reflective foil on one side with attached fiberglass bat blanket on the other) to dampen the noise from rain. Again, installed as per manufacturers instructions.

    Do your quotes include either sarking or anticon blanket?
     
    Last edited: 18th Dec, 2022
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  19. Stoffo

    Stoffo Well-Known Member

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    The size and spacing are different between tile and tin roofs, so these will likely be replaced regardless
    Agreed, Solar powered electric fan with temp sensor so it only comes on when temp in roof space is above 30deg.
    A while bird spinning on a rainy winters night sucking out any warmth (and possibly drawing in moisture laden air) wont help anything.....
    Also a fan of Surfmist
    Also mentioned this earlier, it is great bang for buck, almost a non negotiable must do !
     
  20. Burramys

    Burramys Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks. Surfmist looks good. The roof is being replaced due to it being old and falling apart. Despite the initial high cost of Colorbond and insulation, this will add value to house which should be cooler in summer and warmer in winter.

    Some quotes include insulation, and the lowest one does not - yet. The best anticon price I can find is
    https://sparkhomes.com.au
    13 rolls at $90/roll = $1080, so maybe $2-3000 for the insulation installed. I will ask for lapping and taping - this had not occurred to me. I'll look at powered whirlybirds that start at a certain temperature.

    Solar power is on the list:
    1 new roof;
    2 verandahs that will be fixed to the roof; and
    3 solar that will have the inverter and battery sheltered by a verandah.