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Smoke alarm from Bunnings

Discussion in 'Repairs & Maintenance' started by jins13, 1st Aug, 2015.

  1. jins13

    jins13 Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    Going to install a smoke alarm on a rental property and was wondering if anyone knows which alarm is the better one to purchase. Would prefer it to have battery.
     
  2. Bargain Hunter

    Bargain Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Ionising smoke alarms are cheapest ($10) and are best for detecting fast fires (paper and so forth) as they pick up combustion materials, photoelectric ($15) are better at detecting fires sooner as they sample smouldering fires ie; smoke. Both comply with the current Australian Standard for domestic installations.

    You can get a combination ionisation and photoelectric for around $40.

    You can now purchase an alarm with a 10 year battery life for und $50.

    If I was putting one in my home I would go a photoelectric.

    Regards

    Andrew
     
    Last edited: 1st Aug, 2015
  3. jins13

    jins13 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the details! Learning alot from the current reno project and it inspired me so much that I subscribed to the "Handyman" magazine.
     
  4. Kael

    Kael Well-Known Member

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    Aren't there requirements by law in some states that say you need to change the battery every year though? I thought I read something about it somewhere...
     
  5. jins13

    jins13 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, thats correct. Not sure if the Act is all uniformed but in NSW it has to be changed every year. I know that for new structure, you need to buy the smoke alarm that is connected to a back up so that even if the battery is flat or you take it out, it still works. My friend received a fine when his granny flat didn't have this.
     
  6. WestOz

    WestOz Well-Known Member

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    That's Hard-wired to main elec
    Check state/local regs for what's required at the area the property is in.
    Local DEFS website should also have info.
    In WA we have >This< and >This<
     
  7. Bargain Hunter

    Bargain Hunter Well-Known Member

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    In NSW the tenancy requirements are;

    At least one detector is located on each level of the tenancy.​

    If the detector is fitted with a replaceable battery (9v) then new batteries are to be fitted and the detector tested before each tenancy commences.​

    If the detector is fitted with a replaceable battery (9v) the tenant is responsible for cleaning, testing and replacement of the battery when required. The units must have a low battery alarm (beep) for this purpose (in SA this is the landlords responsibility)​

    Fire & Rescue NSW recommends that;

    Where fitted with replaceable batteries this be done annually​

    Detectors be replaced every 10 years

    Photoelectric type be used

    Installation outside of all sleeping areas (if three rooms come off the same hall then 1 alarm centrally located).
    If the detector has a lifetime battery (5 - 10 years) it is part of the unit and therefore the unit is replaced at end of life.

    Each state may have additional requirements.

    Although for most of our portfolio the cleaning, testing, and battery replacement is the tenants responsibility during their tenancy, we generally pay for a third party to undertake this task annually as part of my SANF.

    Regards

    Andrew
     
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  8. Bargain Hunter

    Bargain Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Since 1997 it has been a requirement of the BCA that all new buildings or existing buildings which have undergone substantial renovations are to be fitted with hard wired smoke alarms.

    Some states now require these to be fitted regardless of age of building or when selling.
     
  9. Gockie

    Gockie I'm an ISTP-A female, so I might be a bit quirky! Premium Member

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    The electrician I got to do some electrical work on the property in Brisbane I settled just on Monday strongly recommended I get the two smoke alarms changed as he told me the two existing ones would have been well over 10 years old. I have no idea how old they were but went along with his recommendation, I think it was only about $40 to replace each of them, and the 2 new units are hard wired in. So all good for the SANF.
     
  10. Bargain Hunter

    Bargain Hunter Well-Known Member

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    That's a great price if the previous ones weren't hardwired.
     
  11. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

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    Get the good quality ones that are hardwired, its the safest option.
     
  12. turfy77

    turfy77 Member

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    Not sure what state the rental property is in but in WA they need to be hard wired which costs a lot more than actual smoke alarms themselves.

    The laws in WA changed recently where all rental properties had to be protected by RCDs and Hard wired smoke alarms. So might pay to check if you have RCDs fitted also (depends on the laws in your state)
     
  13. dan2101

    dan2101 Well-Known Member

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    Always use photoelectric smoke alarms guys. Tests have proven them to be much more effective in providing you the time to get out of your house.

    Although the 'slow smouldering fire' sounds less harmful this is the one that will probably kill you in your sleep in the middle of the night.

    Cheers

    Dan
     
  14. Chilliblue

    Chilliblue Well-Known Member

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    Just remember that even hard wired smoke alarms need their batteries checked.
     
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  15. fullylucky

    fullylucky Well-Known Member

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    Be careful even with the 10yr battery still good to test it bi annually...