Should I brick render?

Discussion in 'Renovation & Home Improvement' started by Damarcus11, 13th Nov, 2019.

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  1. Damarcus11

    Damarcus11 Well-Known Member

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    I have just purchased my first investment property. I am hoping to update the bathroom, kitchen, and render the bricks to make the exterior look more appealing.

    Her is the peoperty: 67 Greenore Street, Bracken Ridge, Qld 4017

    Which of these three renovations should I prioritise before I find a tennant? (Which would have the biggest impact on rent?)

    And what is your opinion of brick rendering? Do you think rendering this property would be worthwhile in terms of creating equity?

    Any tips would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    I’d update the kitchen bench top (can’t tell on my iPhone what the carcasses are like). Bathroom looks dated but I’d leave it for now (assuming no leaks etc).

    No render. It won’t get you more rent. Maybe do that prior to future sale.
     
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  3. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    upload_2019-11-13_18-16-59.png

    I'd be fixing the rust issues on the columns just for SANF
     
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  4. datto

    datto Well-Known Member

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    You get a few sumo wrestler types on that balcony and there could be trouble.
     
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  5. Shogun

    Shogun Well-Known Member

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    I see houses rendered around me. 5 to 10 years later they look like crap and need repainting.

    Kitchen bench top needs a few repairs. Doesn't add rental value but looks maybe a shower screen
     
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  6. Brady

    Brady Well-Known Member

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    I would look at
    - new bench top, peach with chips no thanks
    - spashback or just paint/replace those few 'feature tiles'
    - new tapeware and sink would be quick moderniser


    upload_2019-11-13_18-8-51.png


    Then if you had the money I would move onto the bathroom.

    Render would definitely only be last when looking to sell or reval.
    Tenants usually care about what's inside the most.
    And as stated above looks pretty average after a few years - save for when needed.
     
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  7. Jam

    Jam Member

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    Sorry for the total noob question, but what is brick rendering? Googling suggests that it's simply filling in additional mortar into the gaps between bricks?

    Is this correct, and if so why this a desirable thing?
     
  8. Shogun

    Shogun Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Many like the "look". Sometimes just painting old brick is an improvement. Me I like good quality brickwork
     
  9. Stoffo

    Stoffo Well-Known Member

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    @Jam It is the application of a cement render over the existing brickwork to form a smooth finish (with a color in the cement or painted later)

    @Damarcus11 as per the other comments
    First, anything safety related
    Look at the balcony posts as @Scott No Mates followed by pool compliance.
    Kitchen benchtops, look at cupboard doors and splashbacks whilst you are there as @Brady suggested
    Then the bathroom, should you have the additional funds to update.
    The concrete balconies could be tiled on the cheap to update the appearance
    Also, I would be inclined to put a garden bed across the front entry door area, can be done cheaply and diverts your eye to something "pretty", way cheaper than rendering.

    Keep it all simple, do NOT think with your heart here, think with your head !
    Keep a decent cash buffer first (you never know what costs may arrise).
    Then improve your cash flow and financial position second
    All the pretty things can come later
     
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  10. Paul@PAS

    [email protected] Tax, Accounting + SMSF + All things Property Tax Business Plus Member

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    Rendering covers the brick with a cement mix . The cement surface is generally smooth but can also be textured or even plastered (venetian plaster etc) and can be painted etc. Its a common technique used to hide a shi77y brick. ie an old red brick 1970s house.

    Its costly in terms of labour and loads of cement / sand. But very effective at changing a building appearance and modernising it.

    upload_2019-11-14_9-26-12.jpeg

    upload_2019-11-14_9-26-25.jpeg
     
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  11. Marg4000

    Marg4000 Well-Known Member

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    I would:
    1 Fix/replace the kitchen bench
    2 Repair the back verandah
    3 Demolish the sound proof room (limited appeal) blocking one of the garages. More tenants will want a two-car garage.
     
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  12. Paul@PAS

    [email protected] Tax, Accounting + SMSF + All things Property Tax Business Plus Member

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    Yep ...The splashback tiles may need to go as part of the bench. Same with tapware. Just your basic chrome set. Consider install of a shed for the pool stuff etc.
    I would fill in the bird bath near pool and pave it to match existing pavers. Trip hazard !!
    Maybe consider replace side fence with colourbond. Looks like its had its day.

    Nice place. I woudnt render it for now.
     
  13. Damarcus11

    Damarcus11 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you everyone for all of the helpful feedback. So I've just received the building inspection repirt which stated that the front and back balcony are both unsafe.

    I am extending the building check date, and asking a builder for a quote fpr demolishing both balconies, and sealing up the walls.

    Does anyone have an estimate about how much this will cost? And is is standard procesd to renegotiate the sale price with the current owners to take the required renovations into account?
     
  14. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    I would think the cost of closing up the walls and making good the brickwork and swapping out doors for windows will cost a lot. Why not replace the small balconies? People in Brisbane want outdoor areas to sit and watch the world go by without carrying a cup of coffee down the stairs to sit in the yard.

    I think you will devalue the house by removing them so I’d get quotes to replace or repair and renegotiate the offer price (or move on to the next one).
     
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  15. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    I think that might be a fire pit rather than a bird bath?
     
  16. Damarcus11

    Damarcus11 Well-Known Member

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    This is the building report. Are the cracks in the bricks standard for a house of this age, or should I definitely get an engineer to look at it?
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Other than the obvious reasons on the rear balcony what is unsafe (handrails)?

    Is it also a structural issue on the front balcony?

    Would a replacement timber balcony cut it as a replacement?
     
  18. Damarcus11

    Damarcus11 Well-Known Member

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    I would certainly accept a wooden balcony.

    I'm not sure if the inspector was engaging in hyperbole, but he gave the impression both were totally stuffed. This is my first investment property so I'm not sure how serious the issues are by just looking at the report, I was relying solely on the his words.
     
  19. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Just looked at the building report, some serious issues caused by rust to the balconies, reo looks too close to the surface and is failing.

    A couple of comments regarding restricting the window openings, does that apply to houses in Qld or only to apartments as per the other states?

    Inspector noted that the ground floor had below standard ceiling height, a big concern if you want to use the room as a habitable room.
     
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  20. Damarcus11

    Damarcus11 Well-Known Member

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    As far as I know we will have to fix the windows. But that can be done quite cheaply. Would the legal height be an issue when renting out to a tenant? Or does it just impact how we can advertise the house?
     

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