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School ranking resources

Discussion in 'Information Resources & Tools' started by Leewei, 12th Jan, 2016.

  1. Leewei

    Leewei Well-Known Member

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    Hello, is there any go-to resource for school rankings in Australia that is definitive or the most trusted?
    I'm currently looking at bettereducation.com.au but I was wondering if there is any other site that you guys know about.
     
  2. Propertunity

    Propertunity Exclusive Real Estate Buyers Agent Business Member

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  3. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    Yup Myschool is the govt site for comparing all schools.
     
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  4. Leewei

    Leewei Well-Known Member

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    Cheers! I was looking for this as well. Saw it awhile back but just couldnt remember the link.
     
  5. beachgurl

    beachgurl Well-Known Member

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    Don't take it as an absolute indication though. A lot of the top schools on the lists ask their intellectually challenged students to stay home on the days of naplan testing so they don't bring down the school's result.
     
  6. Chilliblue

    Chilliblue Well-Known Member

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    Often sold to the parents as we don't want to stress poor johnny
     
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  7. Rumplestiltskin

    Rumplestiltskin Well-Known Member

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    Better Education is a reputable site along with myschool,
    Nothing is totally definitive however but between the 2 of them, it's a decent indication.
    Just go between middle of the road and high end private and you'll remove the chaff factor from the start.
    Don't go too cheap, because if it's too affordable, it has all the hallmarks of a pseudo public school, only you're paying for it, often with worse results. :eek:
    Cheaper Catholic schools are notorious for this.
    The better private schools have the resources and ethos to be able to galvanise the students not to fall behind ( along with networks of like minded parents ) whereas if you leave your child to the mercy of the Australian public school system, most noticeably at secondary school level, you will end up having to pay for tutoring( not cheap ) to get your child near similar levels anyway.
     
  8. Gockie

    Gockie I'm an ISTP-A female, so I might be a bit quirky! Premium Member

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    I beg to differ. But I suppose I went to plain old public school, had no coaching... Didn't study too hard at school.... just used natural talents... hmmm.. I suppose if I went to a better school... Oh well. What's done is done...
     
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  9. Gockie

    Gockie I'm an ISTP-A female, so I might be a bit quirky! Premium Member

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    On my facebook my sister put this up, (she's a school teacher), apparently her daughter who completed Kindy has been having fun doing these books during her school holidays. I <3 how one of the books says "skills include: Differentiation".... 12557751_10153252337370843_1444981673_o.jpg
     
  10. Esel

    Esel Well-Known Member

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    The above is just an opinion.

    Private school students have no academic edge over students in the public system, study finds - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    When you pay for private school the only real advantage you are buying is the peer group. Extra facilities and smaller class sizes are nice but they dont have much of an impact on results.

    Parents have the biggest influence. Quality of teaching makes a significant difference but theres no evidence its any better at private schools.

    The bettereducation website is quite simple and its rankings are pretty much just a reflection of soci-economic advantage.

    The myschool website is better because you can compare a school to schools with kids from similar backgrounds so you can get an idea if the school adds any value to the kids who go there.

    I would much rather buy in the zone of a 'good' public school and use the money saved for tutors, holidays and experiences.

    Also, private schools have been increasing their fees at above inflation rates so you need to budget for that.
     
  11. Rumplestiltskin

    Rumplestiltskin Well-Known Member

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    From an economic and standards point of view, it makes sense to go private.
    You will pay a pretty premium to get into a zone of a public school with an even remotely comparable standard to a top private school.
    Much more than you will ever pay in fees at even the best private schools.
     
  12. Gockie

    Gockie I'm an ISTP-A female, so I might be a bit quirky! Premium Member

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    What if a parent has 3 or more kids though....
     
  13. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Hearsay tells me that one of my local PS lost 》1/3 of its 5th class cohort for 2016 & held a graduation ceremony for this group - most going private bar a couple to selective.

    This is double the average number of kids who normally leave at this point. School has no idea why it's losing so many kids. They do know but don't care to listen.
     
  14. Esel

    Esel Well-Known Member

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    Not sure what you mean by standards?

    Buying in the zone of a good public school is a good investment.

    The research shows that your kids would get pretty much the same results from most schools. Thats because the parents are the biggest influence on outcomes.

    Private schools get good results because they get more affluent kids who would do well anywhere.

    Fourth study this year confirms private schools no better than public | theage.com.au
     
  15. CosmicTrevor

    CosmicTrevor Well-Known Member

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    My School is based on NAPLAN results, which uses 5 academic indicators (4 on literacy and 1 on numeracy). Each child gets a score based on their answer to 20 questions in each of the 5. Thus as an indicator it is pretty "blunt", but it is better than nothing.

    You get a better feel for how well a school will suit your child by meeting the Principal and walking around the grounds to observe how the children are interacting with each other and the staff. Also try to speak with other parents to see what they think.

    The perpetual commentary about private schools not providing an academic edge is a captain obvious type of statement. Of course they don't and most openly state this. If all you want is the best academic result "hot house" your child and send them to a government selective school where they can be incubated for ATAR greatness.

    If you want to understand what an independent school will do for your child, go visit one and ask the Principal to explain it in plain English. If you don't think it makes sense then stick with the public system.

    So to answer the OP's original question, NAPLAN may be the best option but my advice is to look at a 3 year period as follows;
    • check the year 5 results for year n, eg 2011
    • check the year 7 results for year n+2, eg 2013 (this is mainly the year 5s from 2011)
    • check the year 9 results for year n+4, eg 2015 (this is mainly the year 7s from 2013 and therefore the year 5s from 2011)
    • see what the trend is for each of the 5 indicators, eg is Reading getting better or worse for the year 5s as they get re-tested in year 7 and then again in year 9?
    Probably not worth the effort, but it will show which schools are doing a better job of developing their students (on average).
     
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  16. Esel

    Esel Well-Known Member

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    If you are just looking at high schools, dont bother with the year 7 data as its more of a reflection of what the child learnt in primary school.
     
  17. Travelbug

    Travelbug Well-Known Member

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    Remember all numbers are not equal.

    When looking at schools that have an OC class it will look like they have amazing leaps from Year 3 to Year 5.
    BUT they have taken the brightest kids into their OC class in between these 2 tests.

    Good public schools rank up the top (and some even better than) some private schools.
    Sure academic achievement in a school is important if you have high achieving kids but it's not the only factor to consider.
    Parents are often under the misguided assumption that their kids will get brighter by hanging around with brighter kids.
    Look at what suits the needs of your child, not what suits the needs of the parent.
     
  18. Esel

    Esel Well-Known Member

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    I think there is a graph on the myschools website that shows this information and can compare the school you are looking at with others or similar schools.
     
  19. igaldvir

    igaldvir Member

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    The Australian has a nice interactive table of NAPLAN results: Your School.

    It's actually illegal to provide a league table of NAPLAN results, so I'm not sure why the government allows that.

    I used to have a map where you can filter school zones based on NAPLAN results. A few weeks after I published it, ACARA demanded that I remove it. I think the same is true for Better Education, that's why they don't have NAPLAN scores.

    It's also worth noting that the different areas of NAPLAN (reading, writing...) are not comparable, so averaging all areas into a single number is problematic.
     
  20. Esel

    Esel Well-Known Member

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    If im comparing schools using naplan data i often just look at the numeracy and persuasive writing scores. Persuasive writing is a skill which generally needs to be explicitly taught and so is the best reflection of teaching rather than say reading or grammar scores which mostly just reflect whats going on at home (socio-economic background of students).

    Also when looking at high schools, i disregard the year 7 data as this test is set early in the year and is more a reflection of whats been taught in primary school.
     
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