Roof line causing ceiling height issues

Discussion in 'Renovation & Home Improvement' started by Talicska, 27th Apr, 2020.

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  1. Talicska

    Talicska Member

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    Hi All,

    I am looking to purchase this home as an occupier and it has an odd roof line that mean a lot of lost potential living space due to the internal slope of the ceiling (see attached). This isnt a huge issue for me currently, but for renovations down the track I would like to know my options.

    Would the only options be to completely re design/replace the roof? or is there an easier fix?

    Very noobie questions I know, but I am new to this and would like to wrap my head around what would be involved. Thanks.
     

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  2. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    That room looks like an enclosed verandah or sleepout - is it at the side or the rear that room?

    It quite normal to have the sloped ceiling as if it has the flat ceiling in that area it would be likely to be quite low.

    If you ever do an extension at that area you can pull back the roof and repitch it so that the new area has a higher ceiling
     
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  3. Talicska

    Talicska Member

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    Thanks Westminster! The location of the sloped roof is the living space (see attached) and continues into the dining space. It would just be for my partner and I, but we would plan to extend and build in under later and would like to make this a more inviting space by increasing the ceiling height.

    Probably a stretch, but do you have an idea of cost? Under roof size is approx 60m2.
     

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  4. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    Looks to me like it is just a lowered false ceiling. It’s quite unusual to have that lopsided angle. And more unusual if it continues into the main roof of the main house. We have Queenslanders and we have lifted such lowered verandah ceilings to give more ceiling height. Very easy to do.

    Can you poke your head into the main roof space to make sure?
     
  5. Talicska

    Talicska Member

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    Appreciate the response. I didn't have a change to poke my head into the ceiling space, but I dont think its is a false ceiling. Take a look at the attached street view image, and refer to the floorplan provided above. The crest of the roof runs highest down the RHS of the house, which means on the left side it is much lower when touching the outside wall... very odd indeed.

    I am guessing that if it isnt a false ceiling it will much more difficult to correct?
     

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  6. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    I just checked a photo and you are right. Our house has a larger front verandah that was closed in. Your roof pitch is quite steep.

    We removed the lowered verandah ceiling (long ago ours was closed in) and raised it to follow the pitch of the roof line.

    In our house the rooms behind do have a sloped roof and are the L-shaped return of the original verandah - with a tiny bedroom behind that and right at the back is the bathroom. Both rooms have sloped ceilings that follow the roof angle.

    Main living rooms and two larger bedrooms and kitchen are all under the main roof and have high but flat ceilings.

    I think the main difference is that our Queenslander (not a big house) is three rooms wide so the secondary rooms have the sloped ceilings that cannot be changed.
     
  7. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    You could swap living rooms and bedrooms to get good height in the living rooms, flowing to kitchen - but of course your bedrooms will have sloped ceilings. And it will mean a bit of rearrangement of walls and front door.
     
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  8. Talicska

    Talicska Member

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    This was my original thought as well. My main concern is maintaining legal height in habitable rooms. An alternative could be to move the spine of the roof to the centre and raise the LHS wall to match the RHS (see attached). Unsure of the costs involved as I havent done this before... I have read online that its around $50/m2.
     

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  9. vbplease

    vbplease Well-Known Member

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    The building code allows the ceiling to slope less than 2.4m, provided more than 2/3 of the room is more than 2.4m;
    https://ncc.abcb.gov.au/ncc-online/...lineLink=01e5e035-afb8-421b-9194-1fcde85c44e9

    I think you'll find that your ceiling will still comply.

    If you change the roof frame (a very big job), you'll end up changing the front gable (front facade) subsequently requiring a development application = more money and more time.
     
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  10. Talicska

    Talicska Member

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    Hi vbplease, really appreciate the reply! I think the hassle vs reward will rule out touching the roof frame... thanks for the advice!
     
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  11. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    /\/\/\ What he said. Don't change the roof.

    Your lower roofs are habitable rooms now, so that won't change.

    But if this was my house I'd prefer the sloping ceilings in bedrooms and change entry to what is currently bedrooms, knock out the walls between those rooms and the kitchen, add a deck on the back and have a huge open room.

    Do you plan on building under? Always try to keep three bedrooms on one level, and try to avoid two up and two down.
     
    Last edited: 28th Apr, 2020
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  12. vbplease

    vbplease Well-Known Member

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    Your room layouts are very similar to ours.. and interestingly we just received our concept sketch from our architect for our raise and build under.

    We're keeping 3 x bedrooms to the right as the size of the rooms facilitate good size bedrooms. We'll keep the bathroom size as is and maintain a smallish 4th bedroom to the rear.

    It really depends what your budget is.. most raise/build under projects extend out the rear to fit 4 x bedrooms with an ensuite + main bathroom + internal staircase. This is most likely going to cost $500k total for everything (upstairs/downstairs/extension).

    We have a very modest budget of $350k, so we're not extending out the back, but containing everything under the existing roofline. The architect came up with the idea of having the internal staircase within the front deck, which is exposed to the elements and will also serve as a greenroom/courtyard.
     
    Last edited: 28th Apr, 2020
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  13. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    This is a good idea as many times the front verandah becomes just a big covered entry, especially if you add a deck at the back connected to living/kitchen area.

    The similar style Queenslander we bought 20 years ago already had the front verandah already closed in with windows, but it was a "nothing" room as it lead to the front door. It was ok as a sunroom, or office, but really was a wasted space in a smallish house.

    We raised the roof to follow the roof pitch, cut a new front door through the vestibule (common to many Queenslanders), closed one of the three doors to that old verandah and turned it into a bedroom. Had we not added a huge deck to the rear, we would have opened it up as a verandah though.

    When we lifted this house, we had to remove the back deck (that was hard to watch) and we had to wait over a year for our DA to be ticked off before adding a new deck. Our tenants are also our friends, and they are loving having a deck.

    Will you add a deck? If not, perhaps it is worthwhile allowing in your layout for a deck to be added later?
     
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  14. vbplease

    vbplease Well-Known Member

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    @wylie did you have all your bedrooms upstairs, with kitchen/living downstairs? An upper level back deck would be a luxury if you had the kitchen/living flowing onto the downstairs backyard as well?

    I think having all the bedrooms upstairs, with kitchen/living downstairs connected to the backyard suits the qld lifestyle and resale value.. unless there is an aspect/orientation which can only be utilised from the upper level? then kitchen/living + back deck would be upstairs?
     
  15. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    We lifted two houses. We couldn't afford to build downstairs in either, and didn't think we would get a return on that much money spent either. Next owners can do that.

    We did have plans drawn up to build under, before changing course, so have kept all living upstairs. We will hand over the plans with the sale documents so they could be used, if desired.

    Both houses will soon be fairly close to new townhouses (our reason to lift and slide in the first place). So we chose not to add a deck that looked into a block wall for one house, and drew up kitchen and living areas downstairs flowing into the small courtyard sized outdoor area. Upstairs all bedrooms with a small original verandah. Currently it is unchanged, all living upstairs, nothing underneath, just battens (both houses).

    The other house had a huge deck that we were made to remove (couldn't even make it smaller - just totally removed). That deck would have looked straight into a wall as well, so would have lost its suburban views anyway.

    We also had plans drawn for that house to build under with bedrooms, second living area, laundry etc on ground level because that house has city glimpses. We are currently adding a new deck that has city glimpses and suburban views. I just need to do a midnight run to trim a few footpath trees to enhance the city views. :p

    It is a bit upside down, but in both instances, the reasons for upside down living are solid (in my opinion anyway).