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Private schools for kids, or invest the cash for the kids?

Discussion in 'Living Room' started by mrdobalina, 20th Sep, 2015.

  1. mrdobalina

    mrdobalina Well-Known Member

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    The eternal debate about the value of private schools. We are at that junction and need to decide whether to send the kids to private schools.

    I'm in two frames of mind:
    1). Yeah why not. We'll do anything for our kids, and wouldn't blink an eyelid to send them to the top private schools. This includes spending $30k per year per kid for 10 years (2 kids);... Or...
    2). Invest the cash (say in a index tracker EFT) that would have been spent on the private schooling, and give it to them as a present when they graduate from uni. I reckon this would add up to about $500k per kid by that time.

    Thoughts anyone?
     
  2. el caballo

    el caballo Well-Known Member

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    Mr D

    As the father of 3 year old twins, option 2 by a country mile ..... utterly self-explanatory.

    Cheers
    Greg
     
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  3. mrdobalina

    mrdobalina Well-Known Member

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    Re-reading it again, it does sounds like a leading question.

    Perhaps the question should be: is the value from private schools (the schooling, the connections, the all round development, etc) worth more than investing the cash?
     
  4. el caballo

    el caballo Well-Known Member

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    Mr D, your initial post was crystal clear. I am of the firm view that self-motivation is the key in academia, not the name of the school. I will have the same choice that you are facing, and for me it really is an obvious choice .... the 500k per child is by far the superior outcome imho.
     
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  5. beachgurl

    beachgurl Well-Known Member

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    I never used to see the value of private schooling until I worked for my first law firm. The majority of law grads went to private schools and some went to the same schools as the partners that recruited them.

    Recently my cousin won a part scholarship to one of the best private schools in queensland. Her new friends are the children of some of the most influential people in the area.

    So I see a private education is a ticket to career networking from a very young age. If your child is gifted enough to be a lawyer or financier then I can see the value. For the average student I'm not so sure.
     
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  6. Tonibell

    Tonibell Well-Known Member

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    We chose option 1 for our two boys.

    Private school from the age of 4 - currently have one in year 10 and the other in year 6.

    Painfully aware of the financial sacrifice but equally happy with the people that they are. No idea about the value of the schooling but happy with how things are going.

    The money side of things sorts itself out as you do not miss whatever else it would be spent on. On these things you make a decision and get on with life.
     
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  7. geoffw

    geoffw Moderator Staff Member

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    Our children started out in government schools, as I had received a very good education through those in my day. However I quickly became quite disgusted with the quality of the education and the lack of caring from many of the teachers. Private school brought back the quality and the caring for us.

    At one stage a financial crisis saw us putting them for a while in a government school (a disaster) then a catholic school in an attempt to repair the damage in a way we could afford- it was even worse. They ended upnin private school again once we got ourselves on our feet again, but a lot of the damage had been done.

    They do look at many of their schoolmates who have it all, but they are grounded enough in reality to be happy with what they have, and even to feel sorry for some of them for what they are missing in real world experience.
     
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  8. TMNT

    TMNT Well-Known Member

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    My 2cents

    If your child is the sort of child that needs a lot of guidance ie spoonfed then a private school

    If they thrive on their own and usr independance as a motivator then a good government school

    I am the product of both and found that i functioned similar in both environments
     
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  9. mrdobalina

    mrdobalina Well-Known Member

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    This is the main reason for us to consider private schools. I like to think my kids can get ahead based purely on merit, rather than who you know. Unfortunately that's not the way the world works...
     
  10. spludgey

    spludgey Well-Known Member

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    @mrdobalina did you go to a private school? I didn't and I turned out fine (or at least I think so).
    I have met people both people that went to private schools and public schools that are successes and failures in life. I didn't really see any obvious correlation between the education system and a person's success in life. In fact, public schools have outperformed private ones in terms of HSC results.

    It's obviously your own decision, but my children will definitely not be going to a private schools because it's too expensive, they don't need to be able to play polo, but most importantly because I'm a staunch believer in free education at a high standard.
     
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  11. AndrewTDP

    AndrewTDP Urban Planning Consultant Business Member

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    Invest.

    I went to a basic state high school. I'm doing all right.

    I'm a self motivated learner. I don't respond to being spoon fed knowledge.

    Also I note that when I was at uni a lot of private school grads had issues with finding info out for themselves.
     
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  12. TMNT

    TMNT Well-Known Member

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    Ive heard so many people say that about orivate schools for making contacts only. Over and over again

    I went to private school howeevr not the last couple of years and i couldnt see myself benefiting from contacts at all.

    Ive even heard people say who cares about the education you get at private schools as long you make contacys for your child to get ahead in whateevr they do.......

    Was a bit disappointetd and disgustrd at the same time
     
  13. geoffw

    geoffw Moderator Staff Member

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    A good government school is the key. The government schools available to our daughters were not good schools. We didn't have the choice of changing government schools without moving house.

    My oldest had one single teacher (in maths) who was passionate and inspiring. The rest had no interest or ability.

    It wasn't a matter of spoon feeding them. They were not being effectively taught.
     
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  14. mrdobalina

    mrdobalina Well-Known Member

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    One of the options we are looking at is to move into an area with a good government school. Or hope that the kids get into the selective public school nearby.
     
  15. mrdobalina

    mrdobalina Well-Known Member

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    I feel the same. I have absolute disdain for the nepotism that occurs all around us.
     
  16. TMNT

    TMNT Well-Known Member

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    When i went to the prviste school

    They tried everythijg not to fail you. Push you push you and spoonfeed you. They didnt want bad publicity

    Wheb i went to a very good governmenr school. They couldnt care less if you failed. Teacher came in one day and said"you guys think you are pretty good dont you. Well let me tell you back in my country 10 year olds are doing this stuff" give me attitude and your out
     
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  17. mrdobalina

    mrdobalina Well-Known Member

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    Nah, went to the local public school. We had barely enough money to buy books, let alone even consider private schools.
     
  18. D.T.

    D.T. Adelaide Property Manager Business Member

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    I doubt there's much difference between a public and private school. In the school rankings, where I grew up in WA, there was often public schools among the top 5 nudging out the private ones.

    If your child is that way inclined I'm sure they'll network with the correct people regardless of school. Majority of the fun happens in the years afterwards when they end up at the same university as each other anyway.

    What would the child pick? I'd pick a first house deposit over a nicer school.
     
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  19. Charlotte30

    Charlotte30 Well-Known Member

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    My children went to private schools. I was very clear that I was not going to compete with affluent parents. I believe that it taught my son, who was a non academic, to set his sights higher. The guys he mixed with had various levels of achievements as had their parents. I think it is about the connections but it is also having the confidence to have a go. Now that he is in his forties it is interesting to see that he is still connected with the same people who challenge each other to move forward. Daughter says that she learned to be very confident and is the only one in her office who does not have a degree.
     
  20. geoffw

    geoffw Moderator Staff Member

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    Btw in Canberra, private school fees were about half of the fees for the equivalent schools in Sydney and Melbourne. We would not have been able to afford private schools there. The choice was easier in Canberra.