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PM didn't change the batteries in the fire alarms

Discussion in 'Property Management' started by Abooking, 26th May, 2016.

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  1. Abooking

    Abooking Well-Known Member

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    My I.P is in NSW. I asked the PM to change the batteries (on the fire alarm and CO2 alarm) at the 6 monthly inspection but she didn't do it. She said that she didn't take a ladder- even though the pest inspector was there with a ladder.

    She said that she would ask the tenant to buy some batteries and do it. If something is going to cost a tenant time and money its unlikely that it will be done. If there is a fire or a carbon dioxide issue and the alarm doesn't work who will be liable?

    From memory the fire alarm is hard wired but unsure how old it is and if its still working without a battery.

    I moved over to this PM late last year and she seems relaxed about things. But maybe she doesnt think about the legal issues if things go wrong.

    What would you do in this situation?
     
  2. Marg4000

    Marg4000 Well-Known Member

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    And if the tenant falls off the ladder you will be held responsible.

    Tell the PM to go back and change the battery, and take a ladder this time. Put the instruction in writing.
    Marg
     
  3. bmc

    bmc Well-Known Member

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    is it typically the PM's responsibility to do this ?

    NSW fair trading states,
    • Where a smoke alarm is of the type that has a replaceable battery, it is recommended that the landlord put a new battery in at the commencement of a tenancy.
    • After the tenancy begins, the tenant is responsible for replacing the battery if needed. Fire and Rescue NSW can assist elderly tenants or those physically unable to change a smoke detector battery.
     
  4. Nick Valsamis

    Nick Valsamis Real Estate Professional

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    She should have told you that during the tenancy it the tenants responsibility to change smoke alarm batteries, just like changing the light globes. So provided the smoke alarm was working when the tenants moved, then they should be changing the battery.
     
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  5. datto

    datto Well-Known Member

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    There's a company that will check your alarms and replace batteries but they charge about $100 a pop. But theydo certify that the job has been done so it's a little peace of mind.

    I just do the checks my self as my IPs are close by.

    Last time I did a smoke alarm check I forgot to bring a 9v battery. So I scrummaged through the tenant's bedside cabinets but could only find AA batteries.

    Anyway, my neck got a good massage before I headed off to the shops to buy the correct sized batteries.
     
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  6. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Just like ur cuz?

    I trust you didn't let the batteries run too low ;)
     
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  7. eek

    eek New Member

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    Guess it was a good thing all you found were AA batteries. Could have been a lot worse!
     
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  8. Jasmine

    Jasmine Well-Known Member

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    Swooooosh...
     
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  9. Terry_w

    Terry_w Solicitor, Finance Broker, CTA Business Member

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    The owner. But you could join the agency as a party to any proceedings.
     
  10. Terry_w

    Terry_w Solicitor, Finance Broker, CTA Business Member

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    If there is legislation in this regard then the tenants would be responsible for the most part - but they could still probably shift at least part of the blame.