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partial demolish of a house

Discussion in 'Development' started by melbournian, 18th Mar, 2016.

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  1. melbournian

    melbournian Well-Known Member

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    wanted to see if anyone has attempted a partial demolish of a house and if so, how much work or $$ did it cost?
     
  2. Propertunity

    Propertunity Exclusive Real Estate Buyers Agent Business Member

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    You'll need to explain the term "partial demolish". Are we talking internal - as in strip out the wall linings, kitchen and bathroom, for example. Or are we cutting some whole part of the house off?
     
  3. RPI

    RPI Property Lawyer, Town Planner Business Member

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    We do it regularly in QLD. Pre-1946 houses need to be kept to the ridgeline but can demolish beyond that point to extend in new work. You can often still get more than that.

    To cost though would need to be quoted. Asbestos much dearer, bricks and concrete dearer.
     
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  4. melbournian

    melbournian Well-Known Member

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    @RPI
    i was looking a site to purchase for subdivision and was wondering if it is worthwhile to cut the existing house by 20% to free up more space for the 2nd dwelling in the event of sub-division and if it is more cost effective as oppose to full demolition and rebuild.
    If know houses can be demo for ard 9-13K but not sure how much it would cost for partial demo and patch works etc.
     
  5. RPI

    RPI Property Lawyer, Town Planner Business Member

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    For a Queenslander style house what they do:
    1. Brace up inside by building the new external wallframe;
    2. Remove weatherboard and windows etc;
    3. Cut through the now overhanging timbers (I have seen this done with a sharp chainsaw);
    4. Replace windows;
    5. Insulate and put back the weatherboards.

    Where the layout does not suit that but the house must be kept, I have also seen them cut out a section of the middle of the house (eg the central hallway), then slide it back together, stitch it up.

    Have a look at 97 Railway Parade Norman Park, that used to have a large verandah on the right hand side that had been converted to a flat. We cut that off and redid.

    Also 77 Railway parade, the right hand side was shaved and built to boundary. No windows, fire rated etc. If you look closely at the front verandah you can see that the right side of the door is smaller than the left.
     
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