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Never leave it too late..

Discussion in 'Investor Psychology' started by willair, 23rd Dec, 2015.

  1. willair

    willair Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I was sitting in a intensive care unit in a inner private Hospital just as the sun was coming up outside this morning,a mate of over 48 years sent one of those cancer screen tests off about 4 months ago,the test came back and he had a problem,a few more tests and they find he has one section in his lungs one in his spine and another cancer in his lower body,it's a bit hard for him to talk ,but one item he said several times was he left it too late to enjoy what he had worked for,it was always about the next job
    paying for marriage stuff ups,and living week by week,but it may be too late now..

    So it always pays to stop and think,every now and again enjoy what you worked for or still working towards ,because another poster in the other site once said,it's no good dying wondering what if..
     
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  2. Travelbug

    Travelbug Well-Known Member

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    Too true. I had a friend that died way too early. He dream was to travel Europe for her 50th but unfortunately she never made it. I went to school with a guy who dies in his twenties from melanoma. Lots of others I could mention.
    That's the reason we have travelled so much and why I just retired. You never know. Working a few more years wouldn't have changed my retirement a lot so why do it?
    I think GenY's have it right. Plan for tomorrow but live for today. Why work 40+ hours a week just to survive (maybe) to enjoy yourself when you are old? You need to have fulfilment while you travel through life, not just at the end.
     
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  3. Bran

    Bran Well-Known Member

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    I see people with cancers in their 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s every single week. Fortunately, most of us get through, thus we still need to plan ahead.
     
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  4. hobo

    hobo Well-Known Member

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    This is actually a real concern of mine.

    I do worry that we have left things too late in life - partly circumstances, partly a natural tendency towards delayed gratification.

    I just hope my "gut feeling" is wrong.
     
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  5. neK

    neK Well-Known Member

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    This is one of the reasons why I haven't bought anything for 3 years now.

    My wife made me promise that I wouldn't buy anything in 2014 (daughter was born) - I could have and would have been sitting pretty - but I'm glad i didn't. She's changed so much between now and then and I would have missed all that.

    I think one needs to pause and appreciate what is around them. What's the point of working hard and building assets for a future (a future for your family), when the steps taken to achieve those those things are what drives your family apart.

    Take the time travel, for the Sydney investors, its had a good run, extract equity (to be ready to buy), travel a little (use your savings sparingly - don't use your equity!), then come back and be ready to pick up bargains when the market falls off :)
     
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  6. neK

    neK Well-Known Member

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    I was browsing 9gag this morning and stumbled across this.

    I was Dying
    First I was dying to finish high school and start college
    And then I was dying to finish college and start working
    And then I was dying to marry and have children
    And then I was dying for my children to grow old enough for school so I could return to work.
    And then I was dying to retire
    And, I am dying... and suddenly I realize I forgot hot to live.

    Anonymous
    Submitted by Nicole Zablocki
     
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  7. SerenityNow

    SerenityNow Well-Known Member

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    It's always a balance between living like there's no tomorrow, and living like it's the first day of the rest of your very long life.
     
  8. Omnidragon

    Omnidragon Well-Known Member

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    Can't always get it right. If you enjoy too much you might not be able to enjoy later. Similarly your life might end in an hour.
     
  9. Darlinghurst Boy

    Darlinghurst Boy Well-Known Member

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    Remember visiting my Mum last year in hospital (terminal cancer) she decided to stop the chemo.

    There was a guy in the next bed a bodybuilder who had stomach cancer and a woman in the opposite bed with late stage cervical cancer, just like my Mother she had no symptoms until its too late.
    Here i am sitting with my mother and the curtains drawn around the bodybuilder guy in the next bed, i heard the oncologist telling him that they will give him new trials of chemotheraphy which will prolong his life to about 6 to 9 months.:oops:

    His family his wife and young kids were there his wife was crying.
    They later left and he got up to go to the toilet and walked past my mums bed, on the way back i looked up at him and he looked at me and said "such is life eh "
    I just nodded.

    What got me was all type of people in there getting chemo and they looked ok , walking around etc .apart from yellowing type skin, their life prolonged by drugs and chemicals, and they seemed to look ok but had been told by their doctor they have about 6-9 months to live. :eek:

    For months last year I got to the hospital at 5am and left at about 9pm ( no visiting hours in the Oncology ward) and got talking to people in the loungeroom areas and come across one guy /patient who was in his 40's lung cancer late stage but never smoked !!

    They just told him theres no magical solution and he was going to die within 12 months.:eek:


    Just spreads to their back and lungs and then they morphine them off.
    Ironically the Sacred Heart Hospice hospital in Darlinghurst lets patients smoke .;) on the outside balconies.
    Alcohol party day is on Thursday afternoons where they have wine and beer And BBQ for patients and families .:eek:
    I know they morphine the patients towards the end ,put some small machine on the upper arm that lets out morphine i presume.

    I dont really forgive them for assisting my Mother to die,but i guess thats being selfish since she wanted to go towards the end.

    They usually tell you to say goodbye before they do it overnight.
    You know when the phone rings at 4am whats happened.

    I was going to go to the Police but it wouldnt of done anything anyway... Its a Givernment secret backed procedure that they kill off the terminally ill to save the beds.
    The Govt even the Police know the doctors are doing this.
    They try to tell you that your family member was in pain and cant breathe etc which was true in my mums case but i believe she still had a few weeks more at least.

    Unfortanetely there is a lot of naive people even on here who trust the Government and are ignorant of the lies and corruption.
    Some people even would donate money to the State Govt if they could.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26th Dec, 2015
  10. Jingo

    Jingo Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Melbourne
    I think having a balance between work, investments, family, friends etc is the key. I went to a funeral on Friday for an 11 year old boy who had Neuroblastoma. He actually lived much longer than the doctors expected - was diagnosed when he was 4 years old. His parents were amazing throughout his illness. They made sure he experienced as much as possible - travelled widely, including to the world cup in Brazil a year or so ago, etc etc.

    So there is definitely the need to enjoy life as you go along. By the same token, I know people well into their 90's who have invested well when they were younger and are now living the high life!

    No correct answer, I don't think...