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Melbourne SE - subdivision newbie

Discussion in 'Development' started by Ash107, 9th Oct, 2015.

  1. Ash107

    Ash107 Member

    Joined:
    9th Oct, 2015
    Posts:
    5
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Hello - what are the steps to subdividing a property?

    I'm looking to buy a ppor which apparantly has subdivision potential (townhouse at the back). As you can tell, I'm totally new to this.

    Ideally, I would live in the house; maybe sell the land at the back if I needed cash down the line (ie backup plan); or, I'd build a townhouse and rent it out as an IP.

    What are the first steps to take? The lots I've seen look fairly standard - driveway down the side, a chunk of 300/400ish sqm's at the back, etc. What's the first step I should take before buying the property? Getting advice from a town planner? Land surveyor? Would really appreciate your advice!

    Edit to add: not really in a rush to build/sell at the back, but I want to be sure it's possible before proceeding with the ppor purchase. Trying to attach a picture to show the kind of generic property I'm looking into. Hopefully I'm on the right track.

    Edit 2: Also, can anyone recommend any Melbourne-based professionals?
     
    Last edited: 9th Oct, 2015
  2. Ash107

    Ash107 Member

    Joined:
    9th Oct, 2015
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    Location:
    Melbourne
    This is the kind of property with subdivision potential I'm looking into. w800-h600-w611-h800-2012228917_11_fi_150902_124609.gif
     
  3. GoOnAndTell

    GoOnAndTell Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Melbourne
    The council will control a lot of it.

    Learn the 'language' so you can ask questions and figure out where you plan to play and start asking the question.

    What council are you looking in?
     
  4. Be Developer

    Be Developer Property Developer Business Member

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    Location:
    Australia
    @Ash107

    Check the zoning of land and overlays(if any) and existing tress (arborist report)

    Best to spend couple of hundred $$$ in pre-purchase report.

    Zoning and Basic property development guide is on our website.(link is in sigt)
     
  5. Jeffb

    Jeffb Active Member

    Joined:
    13th Jul, 2015
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    Location:
    Melbourne
    I assume you are looking Kingston?

    That property with the floor plan you posted sold for 1.25mil this arvo.
     
  6. Ash107

    Ash107 Member

    Joined:
    9th Oct, 2015
    Posts:
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    Location:
    Melbourne
    No, that image was a random thing I found in Google Images to demonstrate what kind of places I was looking at.

    Although specifically, I was looking at places in the Glen Eira/Kingston councils. But have since moved on... *le sigh* to upgrading to a larger ppor in a different region (east... blackburn/ashburton) due to work/family/budget needs. Which means I won't be so focused on development potential; as an owner/occupier, I find that places with no dev potential tend to go for a slight discount, yay for small savings (?)

    Although, the upside of my previous research is that I've gotten a bit better at understanding zoning/overlays.
     
  7. Planning Permit

    Planning Permit Active Member

    Joined:
    17th Oct, 2015
    Posts:
    25
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Hi Ash, Its important to do your homework before you jump into a property subdivision. Yes Councils across Greater Melbourne have different views on property development.
    Below are some of the items to consider. Its very general and by no way complete. Having assessed hundreds of properties for subdivision across Greater Melbourne and surrounds, I found there was really no off the shelf solution.

    Dual Occupancy Sites suitable for property subdivision.


    There are a myriad of things to consider when finding a suitable dual occupancy development site suitable for subdivision. Some of these are listed below.

    • There should be a 3m wide driveway access to the rear yard if that is where the dual occupancy home is to be sited or check to see if two crossovers are allowed by your local Council

    • The site length and area should allow adequate north facing open space for recreation and landscaping

    • The site should be close to infrastructure, schools, shops and transport

    • The title should be clear of restrictions and preferably without any easements

    • All the essential services should be available onsite or in close proximity and run in the most advantageous position

    • The site orientation should be perfect so that the amenities of neighbouring properties are not adversely affected

    • The zoning of your land and it’s associated Schedule should not be restrictive

    • The planning overlays on your land should not be too restrictive

    • The site should be fairly level

    • There should be little or no significant vegetation on the site and on abutting sites within say 5 m of the common boundaries

    • A soil test should demonstrate the foundations will not require additional strengthening

    • There should be no encroachments on your title boundary or by your property on adjoining allotments

    • There should preferably be precedence for similar development in your neighbourhood especially if you are trying to get more than two new homes on the land

    • There should be no restrictive planning overlays burden

    • Your local Council should encourage development to meet their housing stock forecast
      Here is a very simple sketch. North is top of page. Hope this helps. Recommendation.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 20th Oct, 2015