NSW Landlord insurance

Discussion in 'Property Management' started by mun5, 10th Jun, 2023.

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  1. mun5

    mun5 Well-Known Member

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    Hi all

    We're looking for a new landlord insurance policy. Our previous policy didn't cover temporary accommodation due to unlivability, but we're looking for one that does. Is it common for a policy to cover temporary accommodation for the tenant? Is it worth considering? Thanks.
     
  2. thatbum

    thatbum Well-Known Member

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    It depends a bit on exactly what caused the uninhabitability, but generally speaking as a landlord you wouldn't be liable to cover temporary accommodation for the tenant anyway.

    Why do you want it in a policy?
     
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  3. Cadbury99

    Cadbury99 Well-Known Member

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    As per the post above not sure any insurer would want to payout for something that is generally at the discretion of the landlord.
    Some (e.g. Terri Scheer) will cover you for lost rent where the property becomes unliveable and tenant therefore stops paying rent.
     
  4. mun5

    mun5 Well-Known Member

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    In the event where the pipes leak and the kitchen is flooded, I suppose the tenants would need to be rehoused. The rent may be waived, but they'd still need to find emergency alternative housing, right?
     
  5. Cadbury99

    Cadbury99 Well-Known Member

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    Onus is on them to find and pay for it, not the landlord. Of course you may choose to be benevolent but that is your choice.
     
  6. thatbum

    thatbum Well-Known Member

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    Again, assuming the flooding isn't because of a breach of landlord obligations, and the entire premises is uninhabitable - then the usual legal consequences would be that rent would abate for the affected period, and there might be potential grounds for either party to terminate the tenancy agreement.

    But why would the landlord be also then responsible for finding alternative accommodation?
     
  7. mun5

    mun5 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advices.