How to... Mulch Left on Garden Bed

Discussion in 'Landscaping' started by iwantahouse, 15th Jan, 2020.

Join Australia's most dynamic and respected property investment community
  1. iwantahouse

    iwantahouse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    19th May, 2019
    Posts:
    83
    Location:
    Adelaide
    Hi guys,

    I hired an arborist to get rid of some trees in my house. He left all the mulch from the stumps on the garden beds as shown in the picture.

    The idea is to plant some trees later but I'm not sure if I can use that mulch as soil or do I need to put that mulch aside so I can buy soil for the garden bed?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. The Y-man

    The Y-man Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    6,980
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Never enough mulch :D:D:D:D (depends on what tree it was tho)

    Doesn't look like a huge pile .... what are you planting?

    The Y-man
     
  3. iwantahouse

    iwantahouse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    19th May, 2019
    Posts:
    83
    Location:
    Adelaide
    Well one tree was an Oleander and the other one a Bottlebrush.

    It doesn't look like a huge pile but I removed the mulch left from one of the trees to flatten the soil and it made quite a pile at the back where we put it.

    We are not sure what to plant there, maybe some Hedges or Golden Biota Conifers. Can I just make a hole in it and plant the trees using the mulch as soil?
     
  4. The Y-man

    The Y-man Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    6,980
    Location:
    Melbourne
    iwantahouse likes this.
  5. Marg4000

    Marg4000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    4,629
    Location:
    Qld
    Scrape the mulch away from where you want to plant till you get to bare soil.

    Dig the hole and fill with water. When nearly empty, plant the tree then water again. Scrape the mulch back over the bare soil, keeping it around 10-15cm away from any plant trunk/stem.
     
    wylie, Stoffo and iwantahouse like this.
  6. Stoffo

    Stoffo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14th Jul, 2016
    Posts:
    1,724
    Location:
    Sydney
    The mulch/chip will break down over time
    The Oleander shouldn't be too bad after a day or two, just keep an eye out for seed/regrowth and remove/poison.
    You could level off the mulch over the area and leave it for a week or two, water it in to help reduce any nutrient burn (caused by the recntly mulched plants).
     
  7. Shogun

    Shogun Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26th May, 2018
    Posts:
    868
    Location:
    Perth
    If it a valuable tree I am planting depending on soil I add a bag of soil improver to hole before planting
     
  8. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

    Joined:
    13th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    7,691
    Location:
    Perth
    If you have a dog you'll probably need to get rid of the oleander mulch in case it eats it.

    But yes if you want to replant then you'll probably need to move mulch off if you want to improve the soil, plant then move mulch back
     
    iwantahouse likes this.
  9. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    924
    Location:
    NSW
    Oleander tastes absolutely horrible, nothing will eat it, enough to kill that is. Unless they have no taste buds.

    Mulch is for keeping weeds from popping up and also keep moisture in the soil below.
    The ground is for planting trees. If planting trees, make sure you know their requirements such as soil depth, drainability etc etc. many trees dont like "wet feet", so make a raised section to plant into and make sure the mulch isnt heaped up around the trunk as stem rot could occur. Again, research the tree to find out its unique idiosyncrasies.

    Oleandar mulch (or any mulch) should be fine so long as it's been left awhile (weeks or months) to dry out and render any toxins obsolete. Green mulch has a tendency to pull nitrogen out of the soil to help break it (the mulch) down, therefore leaving the plant with nil or little nitrogen. let it sit for a few weeks before mulching the garden.
     
  10. The Y-man

    The Y-man Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    6,980
    Location:
    Melbourne
    You tried it? :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek: :D

    The Y-man
     
  11. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    924
    Location:
    NSW
    Yep. just a taste then rinsed mouth out. All good, but it is foul so nothing will eat more than that first taste and most likely spit it out (as I did).
     
    The Y-man likes this.
  12. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    924
    Location:
    NSW
    Had a row of oleandars, very large, for decades in a open paddock and nothing ever touched them. Horses, cattle, dogs, chooks, pigs, sheep, humans all had access to them even in drought, nothing ate them. But, I guess I should add the disclaimer that apparently they are toxic. So, dont eat it!
     
  13. iwantahouse

    iwantahouse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    19th May, 2019
    Posts:
    83
    Location:
    Adelaide
    Thank you guys, yesterday I started to remove some of the mulch to level the ground and placed it behind the shed. Next step is replacing the current fence for a higher Good Neighbour fence in agreement with the guy next door. After that we wold think of what trees to put there.
     
  14. Silverghost

    Silverghost Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Sep, 2019
    Posts:
    51
    Location:
    Melbourne
    As another poster mentioned, fresh woody mulch will draw nitrogen out of your soil as it breaks down. This can make your plants go yellow. You can try to minimise this by sprinkling blood and bone (which is high in nitrogen) down under your mulch.
     
    iwantahouse and ALT like this.
  15. Foxy Moron

    Foxy Moron Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    250
    Location:
    Regional QLD

    Oleander tastes absolutely horrible....
    You tried it? :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek: :D

    The Y-man

    Sorry to take the thread off course but that reminds of a painting crew I once hired for the outside of an old weatherboard house. Three brothers with wooden teeth who looked liked extras from the Deliverance movie – great at their job though.

    I tried to warn them that they could be sanding back lead-based paint. They just grinned and said ‘nah mate – it doesn’t even taste like lead paint’ and kept on going.
     
  16. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    924
    Location:
    NSW
    They were taking the **** out of you.
     
  17. willair

    willair Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    30th Sep, 2009
    Posts:
    5,015
    Location:
    ..AFL Grandfinal Brisbane ...
    Depending on if that yard is facing north then that would make a excellent home veg's garden,just buy a bag of lime 2 bags of sugar cane mulch any organic compost mix and just dig it into the bed..
    With the Oleandars as the smell from those tree's stays around for a long time,and i have several on a property in nth nsw the wood from those tress is sought after by wood=workers ..imho..
     
    iwantahouse likes this.
  18. iwantahouse

    iwantahouse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    19th May, 2019
    Posts:
    83
    Location:
    Adelaide
    Yes, backyard is facing North. I'm not sure but there is no smell from the oleanders that were taken down and I haver a very good sense of smell!

    Why do you say that North facing backyard are good for veg's gardens?
     
  19. willair

    willair Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    30th Sep, 2009
    Posts:
    5,015
    Location:
    ..AFL Grandfinal Brisbane ...
    North facing seems to work well in Brisbane ,and it may work in your local area that sqm's in your backyard under veg's would save you a lot of money over one year and feed your family in organic food that you know where it came from..Plus the set-up costs would be very low just labour ..imho.
    .
    With the Oleanders on the property that i a have 10% share in the company title ,some are 70 years old and several times a year pre summer pre winter they put out a smell that stays with you for a long time
     
  20. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    924
    Location:
    NSW
    The sun, the light. Gets the winter sun allowing veges to be grown year round depending on frost sensitivity/location. Most veges need sunshine to grow and grow well.