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FAQ How to add an image to a post

How to upload and embed an image to a post

  1. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Founder Staff Member

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    Simon Hampel submitted a new resource:

    How to add an image to a post - How to upload and embed an image to a post

    Read more about this resource...
     
  2. EN710

    EN710 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    ... I mainly copy paste from Paint ...
     
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  3. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Founder Staff Member

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    Given I'm almost always posting screenshots (such as in that FAQ), I typically embed an image by going to Snagit Editor after trimming / marking up the screenshot, select all, copy, and then paste into the forum post which automagically uploads and embeds the image - makes it really easy!

    I don't recommend this approach for regular photos though, since uploading a JPG is typically a much more efficient way of embedding in regards to space consumed and performance when viewing the page.
    • JPG - best for photos with lots of pixels used in lots of different colours and blends of colours
    • PNG - best for images that are mostly text with blocks of solid colour (eg screenshots), and possibly scanned documents
    • GIF - best for images with limit colour space (eg 8 bit colour) or animated images
    • BMP - best left on Windows 3.1
     
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  4. Paul@PFI

    [email protected] Tax Accounting + SMSF Business Plus Member

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    Simon - You mention copyright rules. Good point. Can you elaborate on what may be permitted v's what isnt.

    Obviously uploading a shot of intellectual property (eg all pages of a book) is not allowed but what about a media image repost etc....This seems common
     
  5. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Founder Staff Member

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    I think the topic of copyright is a tricky one - especially when it comes to images and what should be considered "fair use".

    First up - uploading or linking to an image from another website and claiming it as your own is never permitted or justified.

    Embedding an image for the purposes of discussion is where it gets quite grey - but social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook have to deal with this on a daily basis since sharing images is somewhat fundamental to how they operate.

    While these companies are US-based and as such their rules and policies are based in US law - I think we can use their policies as a starting point to assess what is reasonably constituted as fair use.

    Some reading:
    This article has some good points about fair use: Copyright Fair Use and How it Works for Online Images : Social Media Examiner
    1. Do you understand the term fair use? Just because you provide attribution and/or a link back to the original doesn’t mean you’re free and clear. Fair use has nothing to do with attribution. That’s an issue related to plagiarism, which is different from copyright.
    2. Why are you using the image? If it is “…for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research…” you’re on the right track.

      If you’re just using the image to pretty up a post, then think twice; or better yet, get permission or buy a stock image.
    3. Have you transformed the image? If the new work which incorporates the copyrighted image is a “transformative work”—what you created no longer resembles the original—there is a greater likelihood of finding an exception to copyright infringement.
    4. How much of the image are you using? If you’re using a thumbnail and linking to the original location, there is greater likelihood of finding fair use than if you just post the original image. If you’re doing a post about facial features and are just using a portion of the face from an image, you stand a better chance of arguing fair use than if you used the entire image.
    Point 2 is the important one here.

    If you are writing a post and want to illustrate a point and so find a photo on someone else's website and re-use that, I would not consider that to be fair use.

    However, if your post is actually discussing the photo itself (eg. the techniques used in the photo, or the subject of the photo - a specific kitchen design for example), then I think it's more reasonable - since you are commenting on the photo (or criticising it).

    Obviously, commercial outcomes have an impact as well. If you use someone else's image on your own business website without permission - you're likely to get into trouble. Discussing an image on a forum is not generally a commercial activity.

    My general rule would be that discussing a photo or the subject of a photo is fair use - but most other purposes are questionable and possibly unacceptable.

    Thinking back to my own activities - today I embedded a cartoon I saw on a website because I thought it was funny and added to the discussion. I did not claim it was my own image - the image itself had a watermark with the creator's website on it - and I also linked back to the source (which is attribution rather than fair use), but I personally think such sharing should be considered reasonable because it can be a win-win - we get the benefit of the author's humour while the author gets greater recognition of their work and hopefully a few more followers.

    If I had taken his comic and reposted it after stripping out the source information and without any other attribution, or else taken a large number of his works and reproduced them, I would think that is problematic because it makes it more about my benefit than the author's.

    Of course, none of this is based on legal advice - just my own opinion.

    If there are specific examples you'd like me to consider, I'll take a look.
     
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  6. Gockie

    Gockie Problem solver Premium Member

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    I started posting a few Peter Thornhill slides because another poster had already done so, as these slides can often explain a conversation topic really well, better than any other way I can come up with without creating a video myself.

    The great thing about Peter Thornhill slides is that they say "Motivated Money" on them, loudly and clearly. And he's been talked about so distinctively that anybody who has been on the forum a bit and following those threads would know that source? The only slide he had that isn't labelled like that is the Debt recycling slide.

    Otherwise, yes, I always try to acknowledge a source and try to include a link to it. It's good form, good manners, good practice.
     
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  7. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Founder Staff Member

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    Actually, I think you need to be very careful here if you are doing this without permission. This is a good example of something we should discuss further on this topic.

    If Peter makes money from operating seminars where he educates people - then his slides are essentially his intellectual property and a key part of how he makes his money. By sharing the slides, you are potentially depriving him of an opportunity to make money - especially if they are not already made publicly available.

    It would be a different matter if the slides were published on his website or on Slideshare or somewhere - but if you took a photo of his slide at a seminar, or if you have a copy of his slide deck which he gave out at a seminar - then I would not be comfortable sharing them without permission.

    In my example - the cartoon I posted was published on the cartoonist's website - it was already publicly visible.

    Whether sharing a single slide because it helps illustrate a point is going to cause any grief for Peter is difficult to tell - but is really something that should be up to Peter to decide.

    Ironically - taking a photo of a slide at a seminar makes things even more complicated - because it is the photographer rather than the subject who owns the copyright in the photo - but in this case, because the photograph is of copyrighted content (you are reproducing the content by photographing it), then it's the content of the photo which is problematic rather than the photo itself.

    I wouldn't think there would be too much of an issue if you were to somehow manually reproduce some of the content of the slide for discussion purposes - but if it's difficult to reproduce (eg a chart), then that is problematic.

    The next question to answer is - who owns the copyright of the images that Peter uses in his slides? If he created the content all himself, no problem - but if some of the charts are actually generated by third parties (eg an economist), and you then share a photo of his slide on the internet which contains content he does not have permission to share beyond his seminars - then you are potentially creating legal issues for Peter. See - it gets complicated very quickly!

    I wouldn't be so concerned with sharing one slide - but you said "a few" slides - and so at what point does it change from being fair play to completely reproducing his entire slide deck? When does "a few" become "too many"?

    I urge caution here.
     
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  8. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    About 10% of an article, novel, text etc ring a bell? How do you measure the exposure of one slide in a 45 minute lecture or presentation?

    Does it matter whether the presentation is a spruiking event only to get participants to sign up for a more expensive course?
     
  9. Gockie

    Gockie Problem solver Premium Member

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    Cheers Simon. Peter says the source of his data from on his slides, (always on the bottom left corner) however that level of detail often becomes unreadable if it's a photo of a slide he puts up.

    Re: sharing other people's intellectual property on a forum like this.... Yes, agree with the caution. It's a tough one, I've only shared just enough to illustrate a couple of points raised. I could re-draw or try to put in a video I make myself but dang... His original slides are eloquent.

    Attendees of Peters seminar on 8th April 2017 have been given soft copy slide decks of his slides. Anybody wanting to Meetup with me so I can talk through them I'm happy to do... The slides are powerful... But many Forumites live elsewhere.
     
  10. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Founder Staff Member

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    Actually - there is no "10%" rule in copyright law - that is a common misconception.

    It all comes down to the unique circumstances of each individual situation. In some cases, 10% (or even more) would be completely reasonable - while in others, a lot less would be considered by the courts as a breach of copyright.

    Copyright myths - Copyright Agency

    Myth: I don’t need permission if I copy less than 10%

    "Using even a very small part of someone else’s work can require permission if that part is an important or integral part and was the result of skill and time. There are some provisions in Australian copyright law that allow the use of 10% without permission in special circumstances. For example, students can use 10% of a work for their research or study, and educational institutions can use 10% of a work under the ‘statutory licence’ for education."

    The 10% figure only applies to students in specific circumstances - not for general considerations of fair dealing.
     
  11. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

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    @Simon Hampel , Im having trouble uploading a photo today. Kep getting error message saying the photo is too big.
    I have resized it several times all the way down to 3.9mb and still get error. Something wrong?
     
  12. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Founder Staff Member

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    That's strange - I just successfully uploaded a 7MB JPG file without issues using one of my test accounts.

    Are you trying to attach it to a post or upload it to the gallery? There are slightly different rules for each, although you still shouldn't have problems.

    Perhaps send the file to me and I'll see what I can do with it?
     
  13. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

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    Uploaded a jpeg only just before to the Australian dollar thread?
    How do I send to you?
     
  14. Phar Lap

    Phar Lap Well-Known Member

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    @Simon Hampel sorted, was a iphone live photo, converted to a simple jpg, uploaded all good, thanks!
     
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