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Granny flat with board sewerage crossing the back yard

Discussion in 'Development' started by DianeZ, 12th Jul, 2015.

  1. DianeZ

    DianeZ Member

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    Hi, I am currently interested in a property but only want to buy it if I can build a granny flat or maybe can construct dual occupancy in the future.


    It is in a big land of around 1024m2, but there is a board sewerage crossing the back yard and the site is sloping towards the rear part.


    I am just wondering if it is feasible to build a granny flat in the back, if so, is it going to be very complicated?

    How the board sewerage will affect the price?

    Thank you.
    land size.png sewerage diagram.png google earth.png
     
  2. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Well you can see from the map that the house next door has built over the sewer.
    You will have to think about access getting all the materials to the back of your site, will likely have to crane them over the front house.
    Is 15 Milford rd, Miranda even on the market, or is it a private sale?
    Doesn't look to be advertised for sale, and it will be around the 1.6ish mark based on comparison sales recently.
     
  3. Biz

    Biz Well-Known Member

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    Shouldn't be a problem connnecting to it. Depends how bad the slope is. You can build over it but need to concrete encase the line which is costly. Why a GF? Seems like a waste on a block that size in an area like that.
     
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  4. DianeZ

    DianeZ Member

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    It is private sale, more like express your interest kind, I think.
     
  5. DianeZ

    DianeZ Member

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    Because the front house has just been renovated, doesn’t seem like a right time to knock it down.

    As for the granny flat, I just really want a small house for myself to livein as a single person and rent out the front house.

    Don’t know if it is good idea, or I just buy a townhouse, or a cheaper house and a small unit.
     
  6. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    In that case it will likely be way overpriced in the current market.
     
  7. DianeZ

    DianeZ Member

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    And I thought auction is the mean to generate higher prices!!! The agent is suggesting me to make an offer before they put it on the market.
     
  8. Ace in the Hole

    Ace in the Hole Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Would you want to buy/live next to a child care centre anyway?
     
  9. DianeZ

    DianeZ Member

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    I didn’t think child care center would be too much a problem, never lived next to one before.


    Maybe I should just buy a small townhouse closer to Miranda train station.
     
  10. Chilliblue

    Chilliblue Well-Known Member

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    Visit a childcare centre to see if you can stand the noise
     
  11. DianeZ

    DianeZ Member

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    Good idea, I will go check.
     
  12. Excalibur1

    Excalibur1 Well-Known Member

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    As Biz said, concrete encasing is the answer. I'm currently doing that. I was lucky as it will only cost me around $600/ linear meter. It can go as high as $1200. It depends on the depth of the pipes and access to them as well as the type of soil.

    Good luck!
     
  13. M-THIS

    M-THIS Active Member

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    It appears to be difficult to get access into the back when building and living. Wouldn't suggest to be a good dual occupancy block in my "inexperienced" opinion.

    Is this different from an easement and you can just encase it? What would stop you from building in the back of a block?
     
  14. Excalibur1

    Excalibur1 Well-Known Member

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    The rule is to never build on main sewer pipes as you never know when "something" can go wrong and Sydney water needs to fix those pipes and the only way to fix it is to knock your house down. They bear no responsibility for this. So yes it is a risk. I'm building a granny flat on my block and if anything goes wrong i will be out for 100k. Its a risk i'm prepared to take. Pipes need to be encased if you are building on or around 0.6m from them. So it can turn out that you wont need to encase the whole length of the pipe. Its only within build range that needs to be encased. If you can avoid building on it it would be the best.

    You still need to comply with easement requirements it would have noting to do with encasing. as long as you comply with council requirement you can build granny flat. Brazen on this forum/SS has a good site on granny flat approvals http://www.grannyflatapprovals.com.au/ That site has a lot of free info.
     
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  15. Chilliblue

    Chilliblue Well-Known Member

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    Excalibur is correct. Whilst Sydney Water has ways to work around most issues that may arise, anything built close to or over there asset runs the risk of being demolished at cost to the owner.

    This is anything be it garden bed, driveway or building,
     
  16. neK

    neK Well-Known Member

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    I was under the impression that once it was encased then your building should never be knocked down. On the off chance, then its the encasement company that wears the liability?
     
  17. Excalibur1

    Excalibur1 Well-Known Member

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    Encasing is done so that it secures the pipe. However if something does go wrong on the off chance they can still knock it down. Now days Sydney water has tools that help them access a certain point from a great distance, which means they don't need to knock things down.
    I also spoke to a family friend who was a director at Sydney water (retired) and he said that in his 30+ years they only had to knock down one old house to fix some pipes. The house was on pipes that were not concrete encased.

    After what family friend told me I went ahead and purchased the site. As for the libility, I know Sydney water will have no responsibility for it but as for encasing company I'm sure there would be some. I think they would have a clause that says something like "in the event Sydney water has to knock your house down, we bear no responsibility". I would need to check their liability policy.
     
  18. Chilliblue

    Chilliblue Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is rare and Sydney Water will normally go through the nearest manhole. However at the end of the day, if there is no other available access and the issue is urgent enough any structure over will be demolished.
     
  19. bob shovel

    bob shovel Well-Known Member

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    It is very very unlikely, I would even say extremely unlikely syd water would knock down a house.they have the power to but their name was/still is mud, so it's a PR nightmare. I have seen a garden shed, close to being a grant flat structure come close to being knocked down but there areways around it. No concrete and 3m deep in sand with ground water issues.
    I have installed sewer Mains for syd water and also done sewer rehabilitation works (engineer/project manager), so seen plenty of blockages, collapsed pipes, damaged pipes And the fun stuff inside!
    Once the pipe is concrete encased it essentially becomes the pipe, so over time when the existing pipe collapses the concrete holds the shape, then it just gets relined and good for another 50 years.
     
    Last edited: 28th Jul, 2015
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  20. Excalibur1

    Excalibur1 Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any licensed guys that do concrete encasing?