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Fence Extension

Discussion in 'General Property Chat' started by Ryno, 7th Sep, 2016.

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  1. Ryno

    Ryno Active Member

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    Hi All

    I have a question just in regards to a boundary fence for my parents place.

    My parents own the home and the neighbour's are renters. Just recently the owners of the neighboring house constructed a granny flat in there backyard for rent (backyard of there house and side of my parents house)

    There's no issue however the fence is only 5ft. Before the granny flat it was constructed there was no issue as there was a shed and garden which gave a bit of privacy. Now its an alfresco and both houses can see over into the rooms.

    My dad was going to buy extenders for the colorbond fence however i thought id ask if there is grounds for the property owner to pay in full or go halves?

    Thanks in advance

    Ryan
     
  2. MrFox

    MrFox Well-Known Member

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    Me personally when I do a development and the fences need to be build, I don't ask for compensation. I like to keep the neighbours happy.
     
    neK likes this.
  3. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    It was possibly a condition of the building approval. So query it with the council or certifier.
     
  4. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    If not an approval condition, then just ask the owner of the property to foot the bill or, failing that, go halves.

    However, generally the fencing regs talk about a fence being 'sufficient'.

    So if the neighbour isn't supportive, you probably don't have any other recourse as it sounds like your fence does demark the property, keep pets in etc
     
  5. Ed Barton

    Ed Barton Well-Known Member

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    Their, there or they're?
     
  6. dabbler

    dabbler Well-Known Member

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    If there is a dividing fence there, then I fail to see why you think you could ask for it to be changed or expect someone to pay.

    The fence could be wire, so privacy is not the sole reason for a fence.

    You can however erect a fence of legal height on your own property in a material you like if you cannot come to a resolution between yourselves.
     
    Joynz likes this.
  7. WallyB66

    WallyB66 Well-Known Member

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    If the visual element is the issue cheapest option may be plant some bamboo or erect some trellises with passion fruit vine
     
    Joynz likes this.
  8. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    There there. Settle petal. ;)
     
  9. Ryno

    Ryno Active Member

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    Its a colorbond fence. There backyard connects to the side of my rents house. It was never an issue however owner built a granny flat out back and now there is 2 properties being rented out so good on to them.

    I think i might ring the real estate and ask the owners to foot the bill to put extenders or whatevee they want to do. You can buy colorbond extenders.
     
  10. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    Installation of fence extenders will increase the 'sail area' or wind load of the fence.

    Are the existing poles deep enough and concreted in? You don't want the fence blowing over in the first stiff breeze.
     
  11. Plucka

    Plucka Well-Known Member

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    I don't see in anyway why the neighbours would be liable to pay a cent. If the existing fence is adequate and not falling down, if you want to raise the height you pay for it. Oh and you should seek approval from the neighbour to do this as they own half the fence.
     
  12. Ryno

    Ryno Active Member

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    @Plucka the point im trying to get is that last week the backyard of there property was just a backyard with garden shed and garden connecting to my parents side of the house. All of that has been removed and a granny flat has been built and the alfresco area is just outside facing my parents house.

    Im just asking if i have a right to contact the real estate and ask for something to be done to block there outdoor area. Realistically i dont want my parents to pay a cent but im sure there happy to contribute.

    To put it in comparison i can stand at the fence and i can see straight into the property.
     
  13. dabbler

    dabbler Well-Known Member

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    You can ask for whatever you want, but the answer can legally be no, also no to putting extensions & if you do that regardless and fence is dislodged, you ruined a good fence.

    What is the problem, are these new people staring at you ? Why not just see how it goes first. Discuss with new occupants if a problem once they move in and settle, better if they ask for a screen or something.
     
  14. Joynz

    Joynz Well-Known Member

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    Or get your parents to stand opposite the alfresco area and stare at the tenants. That'll get them asking the landlord for a higher fence!

    Ask Council about overlooking private open space / habitable rooms provisions. In Vic, you have to screen ( hard screening) if you are overlooking.
    NSW has different laws, so may not apply. But definitely ask.

    You have the right to ask for anything, but unless there is an overlooking or insufficient fence issue, it's up to the neighbour how they respond,
     
    Stoffo likes this.