Dwelling setback from boundary before fire rating required?

Discussion in 'Development' started by theperthurbanist, 25th Jun, 2020.

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  1. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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    Is someone able to please advise on how close the eave (and/or gutter) of an existing dwelling can get to a survey strata lot boundary before it needs to be upgraded for fire protection? The new boundary fence would be colourbond so no fire protection on that side.

    It is the same <0.6m definition of ‘on boundary’ that is in the R-Codes?

    The site is in WA though I’m not sure if this is a national BCA requirement.

    Thanks guys!
     
  2. Big Daddy

    Big Daddy Well-Known Member

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    I thought fire protection was only if they share the same roof.

    If you build within 0.6m of the boundary is close enough to deem you as actually building on the boundary. Still this is not talking about fire protection.
     
  3. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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    As I understand it any part of the building (roof/eave/wall) built ‘on the boundary’ needs to be fire rated, unless there is a fire rated wall on the other side of the boundary. I’m not sure what is considered ‘on the boundary’ though for the purposes of this requirement, which I assume is a BCA/NCC requirement?
     
  4. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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  5. JoHa

    JoHa Well-Known Member

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  6. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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    Perfect! Thanks @JoHa , though I'd have preferred it if the answer was 0.6m! ;)
     
  7. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    Jeez I didn't see this tag.
    I don't know the actual answer but I "thought" there was some clause or something where you didn't need to do it on the existing house if the new house did meet the fire requirements, ie that a fire in the existing house couldn't spread to the new house because it was fire rated if within xx of the boundary and fire couldn't spread from the new house to the existing house if the new house is fire rated.
     
  8. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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    I ‘think’ that is the case too, but also don’t know the specific clause (any ideas @JoHa ?). My query in this case actually relates to a colourbond fence, so this exclusion couldn’t be applied; though on another part of the boundary we are hoping to avoid fire rating the main extent of the existing eave on boundary by fire rating the adjacent new wall.
     
  9. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    Do you know what your eaves are made of?

    upload_2020-7-3_9-39-59.png
     
  10. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, not sure... ‘the usual’?
    upload_2020-7-3_10-3-35.png
     

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  11. theperthurbanist

    theperthurbanist Well-Known Member

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    Just reading through 3.7.1.2 of the NCC and it sounds like most of the materials that the eave lining would be likely to be made of are considered 'non-combustible':
    (a) plasterboard; and
    (b) perforated gypsum lath with a normal paper finish; and
    (c) fibrous-plaster sheet; and
    (d) fibre-reinforced cement sheeting;

    Would it be a safe enough assumption that the eave lining of a 40-50 year old brick and tile dwelling would be one of the above materials (plasterboard, I would have thought)?
     
  12. Westminster

    Westminster Tigress at Tiger Developments Business Member

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    I agree. It will be a or d
     
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