Draftperson versus Architect

Discussion in 'Development' started by nubee, 25th Feb, 2020.

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  1. nubee

    nubee New Member

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    Hello all
    I have a property in eastern suburb melbourne (knox council) , it has one older dwelling in the middle of the 700 sqm block of land. The front of the house is about 20m and was wondering the feasibility of building 2 single level dwellings side by side.
    The council planner was generous and looked at our concept sketch and said no issues.
    Now talking to some design shops suggested by the custom builder- huge difference in cost ! From $8000 to $25000 for desi and getting plans approved with Engl drawing! Why such a diff?
     
  2. Sackie

    Sackie Well-known cafe bum of the East Premium Member

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    This article is a good summary of differences they may have.

    Draftsman vs Architect: What is the Difference? - Blog


    Having said that, I've always used an architect and paid between 20- 35k for drawings, depending on the type of project. I recently engaged a recommended drafty who works from home with little overhead costs. He charged me 1/3rd or less what I usually pay and did a decent job. Well worth the saving.

    If you know what you want, and are able to give the drafty some to alot of direction re ideas and artistic design, then it's a good option IMHO. But if you're relying 100% on their designs/ input etc, then it possibly can be challenging,
     
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  3. nubee

    nubee New Member

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    thanks for the link. Will read it.

    yes, we very sure what we would want in design and function.
    Can I ask who you used ? Was it in Melbourne ?

     
  4. Sackie

    Sackie Well-known cafe bum of the East Premium Member

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    No not Melbourne.
     
  5. Tufan Chakir

    Tufan Chakir Well-Known Member

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    If you are comparing $8k with $25k make sure you are comparing the service, and what you are being offered as well. Take time to ask the right questions and talk to the people making the offers. Chances are the services being offered are different. Small example - building permit drawings vs tender drawings - huge difference in the work and therefore the cost.
     
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  6. Depreciator

    Depreciator Moderator

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    I have used architects a few times. I am always very sure beforehand of what I want and think I have good ideas. They always surprise me and come up with something I had not thought about.
     
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  7. Zenith666

    Zenith666 Member

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    Depending on what you are building, if you are selling them and the market that you are aiming for, it may be beneficial to use a good Architect. They have the name, may better the design and you may finish with a much better end product, hence the price.

    Although not across the board, in Brisbane, there are a number of places selling because they were designed by an award winning architect and built by a builder turning out some amazing end products. i have also found that when speaking to builders, designers etc, if the architect that designed the site has credit in the industry, many people jump at the chance to put their name towards it as well.

    At the end of the day it comes down to cost, end product and desired market. So if you are going to sell it, how are you going to stand out in the crowd of developers, cookie cutter subdivisions, and DYI home renovators?
     
  8. nubee

    nubee New Member

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    thanks for replies, I will be living in one and renting the other. I agree with your point , especially nowadays when every house new build looks similar. But yeah cost is a constraint.

     
  9. Silverson

    Silverson Well-Known Member

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    Cheap for are architect!
    Is this for just their services or complete DA process I.e council, arborist, planner etc?
     
  10. Lone_Wolf

    Lone_Wolf Well-Known Member

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    Who's got a good drafty that can recommend in Vic
     
  11. Lizzie

    Lizzie Well-Known Member

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    The builders I have used tend to prefer Draughtperson to Architect - they often found with architect drawings and ideas, they look amazing but not practical to build or even live in.

    For a basic design - or if you know exactly what you want (ie, bodgey up some other plans that you found online) then use a draughtsperson
     
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  12. Depreciator

    Depreciator Moderator

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    Yep. Most builders are not fans of architects. That's because most builders don't like to be challenged - unless it's a cost + job. If they see something in a plan that is not a right angle, they will find reason why a right angle will work better and press the point. If they see a construction detail with a curve, they will down tools and walk off the job.
     
  13. Lizzie

    Lizzie Well-Known Member

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    No even as tricky as that.

    My builder was working on one, the same time he was working on mine ... and loved the challenge of my - refer "house built by Lizzie" thread - with all it's angles and offsets ... the other house had a stairwell that had no means of support. Not just "not visible", just totally "no means" - so the builder had to try and work out how to implement the stairwell without compromising the architects vision with the fussy client.

    Apparently it was a nightmare
     
  14. Paul@PAS

    [email protected] Tax, Accounting + SMSF + All things Property Tax Business Plus Member

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    Some are akin to comparing a house painter with Michael Angelo. If you want a bespoke solution and have deep pockets the architect is the one. Budget and vision may influence this.

    I had a client with an architect designed "grand design" beach house. Went way way way over budget with design features that were unconventional making hell for the builder. The ocean facing fllor to ceiling glass wall across whole house was several hundred thousand in materials and you cant do that without a nice floor which was polished terrazzo. And a customer hardwood panelled ceiling. All suspended on a steep cliff at Whale Beach and additional supports had to be engineered half way though. His wife hated the place as it had NO window coverings. No privacy and full sunshine at 5:15am in summer. They then had to add external screens and window tint that the architect was horrified with but they had to live there.
     
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  15. Depreciator

    Depreciator Moderator

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    But if he pulled it off, that staircase probably looks great.
     
  16. Lizzie

    Lizzie Well-Known Member

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    I believe they pulled it off - not sure about the visual income but his carpenters nearly walked off the job over it
     
  17. Zenith666

    Zenith666 Member

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    Couldn't agree more, Builders who are building 'boxes' to flip as quickly as possible to allow them to move onto the next project want a design that is as simple as possible to build. There is nothing wrong with this, however this is why you will always see large unit/townhouse sites are generally 'boxes' with 4 walls up and down. They try to add some glam in the finishes but you strip the design down to its bare bones, it will just be a box. But then, is this what people want or can afford?

    God forbid there be any cantilevering or anything with curves on their own projects, cause this costs time and money, something they are strictly against (when building their own project). Finding that balance between design and build cost is key!
     
  18. Tufan Chakir

    Tufan Chakir Well-Known Member

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    As an architect I design cost out, rather than in. I look at structural systems, and construction as part of the design process. A good architect is one who looks at the building/design holistically and not just aesthetically. A good architect has the skills to do that. Curves and angles and funky - waste of time money and more often than not fashion statements without design integrity.
     
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  19. Lizzie

    Lizzie Well-Known Member

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    Sadly many architects look at the design the other way ... and curves/angles and funky date rather quickly.

    Remember when curved roofs were briefly all the rage ... now they simply date a house to the 1990's
     
  20. Paul@PAS

    [email protected] Tax, Accounting + SMSF + All things Property Tax Business Plus Member

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    Flat roof and boxy designs are all the rage at present. And matt colourbond.
    This will become fashionable like a 1970s orange kitchen and later date homes to the twenty-teens. And likely become the source of leaking roofs for subsequent owners who also need to upgrade and replace solar systems