Join Australia's most dynamic and respected property investment community

Domestic violence leave

Discussion in 'Living Room' started by Bayview, 25th Nov, 2015.

  1. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    22nd Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    2,716
    Location:
    Mornington Peninsula
    Billy Bob has announced that if he were PM, he would make it compulsory for Employers to provide 5 Domestic Violence Leave days per year to every Employee.o_O

    I wonder how many days compensation he will add for the Employers who get bashed by the disgruntled Employee who lost his job through redundancy/downsizing as a result? :p:eek:

    Or; compo dollars to the Employer; to cover the cost of another Staff to cover the Employee who is on domestic violence leave?

    Whilst I abhor these pathetic acts of violence; we already have 11 sick days per year to cover all that.

    Good one Billy Bob; another vote grab.
     
    Last edited: 25th Nov, 2015
    Brian84 likes this.
  2. Ozzie in Texas

    Ozzie in Texas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3rd Nov, 2015
    Posts:
    497
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    What Australian govt needs to do is get real and take responsibility for its citizens. While waiting for my green card in Los Angeles many moons ago, I worked at a safety house for women and children.

    Australian govt and law enforcement have many lessons to learn from overseas experience. There can be no room left for doubt and flippancy when police are called out.

    In California, there are incremental punishments and jail time for each offense the offender commits.

    Until the day, we as a community accepts is zero tolerance, it will continue. I have no problems with employers being lenient and providing time off. But this, in and of itself, isn't the answer. Commitment has to came at all level of government, law enforcement, and community.
     
    Ezzo, wylie and BigKahuna like this.
  3. thatbum

    thatbum Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    899
    Location:
    Perth, WA
    Are you trying to say harsher sentences and more imprisonment works as a deterrence? Because I'm pretty sure the research says conclusively that it doesn't.
     
    Wall Street likes this.
  4. MTR

    MTR Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    19th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    7,399
    Location:
    Perth, Melbourne, USA
    Agree
    More than 60 women killed so far this year from incidents of domestic violence.
     
    vtt, Xenia, Beanie Girl and 2 others like this.
  5. MTR

    MTR Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    19th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    7,399
    Location:
    Perth, Melbourne, USA
    Unfortunately Terryw we are doing something wrong in Australia just read the stats I mentioned.
     
    Xenia and Beanie Girl like this.
  6. Perthguy

    Perthguy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23rd Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    4,701
    Location:
    Perth
    Our approach in Australia isn't working but I don't think jail time is going to help either. I watched a documentary the other day about a program they are running for offenders in the US. In Australia, if the police are called out to a domestic violence complaint then they try to mediate and calm the people down. In the program I saw if the police are called out, at least one of the parties will be arrested. It is mandatory. From there the offender will have an option of going into a domestic violence program or going to prison. Most choose the domestic violence program and it has proved very effective in reducing the incidence of re-offending. I would like to see a program like that introduced in Australia.
     
    Xenia, gman65 and wylie like this.
  7. Ozzie in Texas

    Ozzie in Texas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3rd Nov, 2015
    Posts:
    497
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Really.....I don't care if it works or not. Throw offenders in jail for as long as it takes for them to get it......and if they don't, oh well.

    Jail isn't a deterrence to most crimes.....but it is a message to society of what is acceptable and what it isn't.

    And this has to be balanced out with compassion and support to victims.
     
    MsAli likes this.
  8. Perthguy

    Perthguy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23rd Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    4,701
    Location:
    Perth
    The "message" is not working in Australia. A different approach is needed for sure.
     
  9. Ozzie in Texas

    Ozzie in Texas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3rd Nov, 2015
    Posts:
    497
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    There needs to be a cultural shift that is supported by zero tolerance by the legal system for it to change.

    We don't accept anyone taking a swing at us in any other parts of our lives......and until we all accept that is also what we should expect in the privacy of our own homes, domestic violence will continue.

    I am all for cognitive therapy in support of jail time. But research also shows that therapy does not make sufficient timely changes to stop violent behaviour. Jail time is used to protect society in all other crimes. Domestic violence is no different from any other crime.

    I have open discussions with my boy children about sex and how I accept them to treat women always. That is my contribution to society. That, and the hope and want for better.
     
    BigKahuna likes this.
  10. beachgurl

    beachgurl Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    455
    Location:
    Sydney
    If it did get approved, I don't see too many people requesting that leave. So many that are suffering do it behind closed doors and I doubt employees will admit to their boss it is happening, let alone ask for the additional leave.
     
    MTR and Esel like this.
  11. Ozzie in Texas

    Ozzie in Texas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3rd Nov, 2015
    Posts:
    497
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    And yet, women and children still find themselves into safe houses........and still need to figure out how to stay there without shame and retribution.

    I'm not sure additional paid leave is the answer........as that it too easy. It shifts responsibility to employers........without anyone else taking equal responsibility.

    Australian workforce is more accepting of mental illness as a valid reason for not turning up for work. As I said above, domestic violence has to be legitimized as a cultural and legal issue for there to be a meaningful change in attitudes.
     
    BigKahuna likes this.
  12. JDP1

    JDP1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    2,839
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I can't believe any politician would be stupid enough to day that...actually...I can...
     
    Bayview likes this.
  13. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    22nd Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    2,716
    Location:
    Mornington Peninsula
    I think it's pretty hard to stab your wife to death if you are in jail for 25 years with no parole...this is what these blokes should face..

    Problem is; currently the punishments are light/non-existent unless the wife presses charges - many won't do it.

    Years ago, the cops would pay a visit to the bloke, take him out for a bit of a drive, and "telephone book" him a bit.....

    And then promise to come back if he hit her again...
     
    Last edited: 25th Nov, 2015
  14. Ozzie in Texas

    Ozzie in Texas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3rd Nov, 2015
    Posts:
    497
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Not years ago. That is still the approach. And we see it in sports as well..........and we constantly explain it away as a macho testosterone fueled environment. We so easily dismiss it because they are just doing what "blokes" do.

    I know many will read my posts and accuse me of being one of those crazy feminists. I am not actually.

    Edit.....What is a crazy feminist anyway. I need to stop doing/saying that myself.....because it just perpetuates an illusion that men and women want different from their lives.

    I just know the difference between right and wrong........and expect and hope for better.
     
    Last edited: 25th Nov, 2015
    SerenityNow and BigKahuna like this.
  15. Esel

    Esel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    4th Aug, 2015
    Posts:
    405
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I wonder if the primary aim of this kind of policy is also designed to break the silence and nudge a victim towards support services.

    My workplace has had this type of leave for a while. I thought it existed across victoria.

    In the UK police officers wear cameras so they have evidence for DV cases even if the victim doesnt want to press charges.
     
  16. MsAli

    MsAli Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    1,147
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    78 to be precise :| Source: Destroy the Joint
     
    Xenia, Beanie Girl, MTR and 1 other person like this.
  17. Ozzie in Texas

    Ozzie in Texas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3rd Nov, 2015
    Posts:
    497
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    The same for California. It doesn't matter what the victim wants to do........the law recognizes that the victim is a victim......and they may not always know what is best for themselves or their children.
     
  18. Bayview

    Bayview Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    22nd Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    2,716
    Location:
    Mornington Peninsula
    There was a lady interviewed on the radio yesterday who is responsible for taking photos of the injuries for evidence; inflicted on the women who come into her Hospital. She then hands it over to the Police.

    Great idea and should be in every emergency room.

    Only problem is; women who want to keep it a secret will probably stop going to get treatment if they know the evidence will convict their partner/husband.
     
  19. Ed Barton

    Ed Barton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    19th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    1,122
    Location:
    Brisbane
    The QLD govt has introduced 10 days 'domestic violence' leave for it's employees. Not sure if it applies to pollies?
     
  20. bob shovel

    bob shovel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    5,381
    Location:
    Somewhere in the land of Oz
    Who is billy bob :oops: