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Brick veneer vs Queenslander home

Discussion in 'The Buying & Selling Process' started by ashimashi, 5th Apr, 2016.

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Which option would you choose?

  1. Option 1

  2. Option 2

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  1. ashimashi

    ashimashi Well-Known Member

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    Brick or Queenslander...?

    Option 1: Single story brick veneer home 3-1-2 (no real option of adding further living areas) but possible renovation down the track to kitchen, outdoor area + rendering and new fencing front of the house etc on a 615sqm block. Price estimate: $310k-315k. Rental appraisal $330-$360.

    Option 2: Double story Queenslander home cypress timber, currently 4-1-2 on 615sqm, with option of adding further living area/bedroom/bathroom downstairs turning it into a 4-2-2 or even a 5-2-1 if need be plus other renovation needs such as repaint on outside down the track. Price: $360k, rental appraisal $370-$400.
     
  2. Bran

    Bran Well-Known Member

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    Can't answer based on that information alone... But if I were, I'd pick the bottom one given the value add which might translate into equity/increased rent.

    Are they next door to each other and everything else equal? Soooo many other factors.
     
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  3. ashimashi

    ashimashi Well-Known Member

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    Sorry should have mentioned, everything else is pretty identical. Same suburb, only around 1.5km's between the properties. Same block size, option 1 is a 30 year old home, option 2 is 40 a year old home.
     
  4. Bran

    Bran Well-Known Member

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    Is the living space comparable?
    High sets are popular in some areas, preclude some renters in others
    Is it legal height?
    Is there demand in the area for creating a downstairs living/bedroom area

    Typically, brick should be less maintenance, but my brick house has been the worst for me.
     
  5. ashimashi

    ashimashi Well-Known Member

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    Yep, current living space is quite identical, besides the fact that Queenslander has the option for creating further living area/bathroom/toilet downstairs. And yeah, it's legal height.

    Well, i mean to be honest i don't know if turning it into a 5-2-1 is feasible, but 4-2-2 there is demand. I have seen several Queenslander homes in the area having turned their downstairs into further living space. If properly done of course, i have seen some horror ones and i have seen some really well done ones.

    That's exactly what i was thinking, brick = less maintenance. But on the other hand i like the fact that i have far more options when it comes to the Queenslander home, don't know..:(
     
  6. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be scared of a QLDer.
    As long as you get a decent B&P done, there's nothing more to worry about than a brick house.
     
  7. HUGH72

    HUGH72 Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the area, looking at the price range and rent is it in Ipswich, Redbank, Redbank Plains etc or Logan?
    How does each option compare in terms of value relative to others in the suburb?
    I would prefer option 1 as it will require substantially less maintenance and painting every few years.
    If option 2 was a house in Holland Park, Norman Park or Cooparoo then I would pick this option and renovate, built underneath and create equity and value. Looking at the price range its not in an inner city suburb.

    Without seeing either and making essentially an uninformed guess I would pick the lower maintenance and possibly safer option 1.
     
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  8. Bran

    Bran Well-Known Member

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    You could get 99 votes for an option, and 1 for the other and still wouldn't make it the right choice!

    Then also... Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 8.27.12 pm.png
     
  9. Heinz57

    Heinz57 Well-Known Member

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    Queenslander no brainer. Built to last, repairable. RM Williams Boots v K Mart. sheesh.
     
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  10. HUGH72

    HUGH72 Well-Known Member

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    Haha..Some are, I remember looking through one in Morningside at the peak of the last cycle in 2008, it was listed for 600k+
    I was quite keen on the place in a good location not far from Morningside train station, it wasn't far from Norman Park.
    My opinion changed when I inspected the place, there seemed to be a large bulge in the centre of the lounge room and the whole place could be rocked from side to side.
    The agent said it needed a little work, everything needed a lot of work.
    Disappointed, I didn't end up making an offer although if a similar opportunity came up now I might jump as I can see the potential.
     
    Last edited: 5th Apr, 2016
  11. ashimashi

    ashimashi Well-Known Member

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    Did get a B&P done, came back with a couple of major defects. I mean i knew the B&P on a 40 year old home would come back with issues, but some of them are quite off putting and need immediate attention. Even though the vendor has offered to have them fixed prior to settlement, i am just wondering in the long term if i am not better off getting a brick?

    I know, i kind of have already made up my mind. I just thought it would be interesting and i was curious to see what others on here would do etc.

    Ditto! Happened to me too. It's got a slight dip in the floor boards on the one i am looking at + a handful of rotten floorboard timber joists that need replacing, and roof joists. But i can also see the potential, just worried about future issues/costs compared to a brick.
     
  12. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

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    If one is 40 years old, is that the Queenslander? Is it a Queenslander or simply a 40 year old weatherboard house? Most Queenslanders are much older than 40 years (unless it is a reproduction?)

    40 years ago was 1976. They weren't building Queenslanders then.

    I think it very much depends on area and style of house. Just on the information you've given, I'd go the timber (Queenslander or simply weathboard box), but so much depends on the area.
     
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  13. MSD

    MSD Member

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    If it was a 1920-40's Queenslander, inner city and for my PPOR, then I'd have opted for the Queenslander...

    However, I voted for the brick veneer. I would go for the lower-maintenance option for a rental property.
     
  14. Azazel

    Azazel Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the build quality as well.
    There's wooden structures that are 100's of years old.
    Major defects? That would make me wonder about any house. A brick veneer house is still wood inside.
     
  15. ashimashi

    ashimashi Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it must be a reproduction then, because the property was built around 1975 to be exact. Personally i like the look of the house and the options it comes with, being able to do some work on it etc in the future. I just personally don't have much experience at all when it comes to Queenslander/reproduction homes etc.

    Yeah, just some sub floor timbers need replacing, some roof framing defects involving split timbers and timber fungal in the deck framework, balustrade and rails needing adjusting and decking timber needing replacement + some bathroom work and pipe replacement. All of which vendor has offered to get fixed. We just agreed to have the B&P time frame extended for another 72 hours to allow them to get a builder out there and get a quote on how much it will cost to get fixed and make a decision then.

    Oh, also in the report, there was a "dip in floor adjacent nib wall to kitchen and lounge room" around 10mm. Other then that, i think mostly minor issues that come with a 40 year old home.

    I'm happy with the 72hr extension though, allows me more time to look into the brick house a bit further and make my decision.
     
    Last edited: 6th Apr, 2016