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Blind compliance - What to do with a landlord?

Discussion in 'Property Management' started by Kai41314, 17th Oct, 2015.

  1. Kai41314

    Kai41314 Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    My PM has done an entry report for a property in Logan I just purchased. PM told me some of the blinds are non-compliant with The Trade Practices (Consumer Product Safety – Corded Window Coverings) and fines may be applied. PM asked me to allow them to proceed with the work required to ensure that the blinds are all compliant within the property.

    I found this is a bit weird and not sure if it is anything to do with me because after reading the regulation details, it seems to apply to who supplied and installed those products. These blinds looks fine and not very old and might be fitted a few years ago by the previous owner.

    Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: 17th Oct, 2015
  2. DaveM

    DaveM Adelaide Buyers Agent & KFC Strategist Business Member

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    Yes coded blinds need to be compliant with legislation to prevent child deaths. Just dont let them sucker you into annual blind certifications
     
  3. Kai41314

    Kai41314 Well-Known Member

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    @DaveM - Yes, I understand the code and purpose after read it. My question is more about the the liability. It looks like only product company is liable not the landlord so I don't know why did my PM tell me fines may be applied. Please see the link below. Did I miss any section listed in the regulations?

    https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/F2010C00801/Html/Text#param0

     
    Last edited: 17th Oct, 2015
  4. cheekykoon

    cheekykoon Well-Known Member

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    Why do you say so? its not necessary to do an annual blind certifications ?
     
  5. Scott No Mates

    Scott No Mates Well-Known Member

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    The blind cords may magically lengthen over the course of the year.
     
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  6. Kai41314

    Kai41314 Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm....I have never heard about this certificate in VIC. I have another IP in VIC.

     
  7. DaveM

    DaveM Adelaide Buyers Agent & KFC Strategist Business Member

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    Its a grey area. The law applies to supply of and install. However ignorance isnt a defence and these days if theres an issue, lawyers sue everyone nearby and see what sticks.
     
  8. DiligentPM

    DiligentPM Well-Known Member Business Member

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    It is important to offer a safe home to market. Imagine if a baby died in your property from dangerous cords...
     
  9. Kai41314

    Kai41314 Well-Known Member

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    @DiligentPM - Agree and I am considering to install something that has no cords ( e.g. eyelet curtains). Any other good ideas?

     
    Last edited: 18th Oct, 2015
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  10. HUGH72

    HUGH72 Well-Known Member

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    And quite a bit of it can stick unfortunately but annual inspections is a bit much.
     
  11. cheekykoon

    cheekykoon Well-Known Member

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    I think its a insurance against lawsuits. I'll take the insurance any time.
     
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  12. Michael Thomas

    Michael Thomas Member

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    Hi

    1. You are correct in saying that the regulations apply to the "suppliers". Legally speaking, landlords are considered to be suppliers to the tenants of the blind furnishings in the property.
    2. The new standard, which actually took effect in 2011, applies only to blind furnishings supplied from the 2011 date. It is not retrospective, so in itself does not require homes with internal corded window furnishings installed prior to the new standard, to comply with it. Technically, if your window furnishings continue to meet the standard that applied at the time they were supplied and installed, you need do nothing except ensure they continue to meet that standard ....
    .... HOWEVER ....
    3. If your property is a rental, as a landlord you must look carefully at Section 185 of the RTRA Act (Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation). This piece of legislation places the onus on landlords and agents to "ensure the property is fit and safe to live in". Given that the new corded windows standard is in effect due to identifiable hazards of strangulation of young children with cords under the previous standard/s, this presents an argument that a property not meeting with the new standard poses a real hazard to the safety of young children. Given this, without having the internal corded window furnishings brought up to the current standard, there is a risk of litigation should an incident occur.
    Based upon this, I recommend having them sorted.

    When armed with all the information (above), rather than someone telling you it must be done under the new safety standard when clearly the new standard is not retrospective, you can then make an informed decision without feeling like somebody is trying to trick you.
    I hope this helps.

    I can recommend an experienced, honest and reputable company that can do this for you if you decide you should have it done.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 27th Jan, 2016
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  13. SeafordSunshine

    SeafordSunshine Well-Known Member

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    In NSW, I bought little 'holders', keeping the 'chains in place' That was it. About 20 c per hook thingy.
    Attach to loose chain so its taut, screw into wall. Finished. Ask your insurer whats required to keep any kiddies safe....Sounds a bit scare mongery...
    I hope this helps
     
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  14. Michael Thomas

    Michael Thomas Member

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    Bunnings sell cord tensioners with warning label as a pack for around the $4.00 - $5.00 mark each.
    Install these using the correct type of screw (length and gauge) required for the substrate you are installing the safety device into that is required under the new standard - must be able to withstand a force test (so don't just screw into Gyprock).
    If there are single cords that are able to form a loop of 220mm at 1600mm or less from the ground (basically single cords at 1380mm or less from the ground), get the cleat with label pack (approx same price as tensioner) from Bunnings and install the cleat above 1600mm from the ground for the cord to be tied around.
    Tensioners can be below 1600mm with looped cord or chain secured inside, with the cord or chain taut, exactly as SeafordSunshine has mentioned. Spot on.
    The above is simply a rough guide only.
    Take care with horizontal venetians, as some require a cleat on both left and right sides, as the cord that raises the blind (typically well above 1600mm when the blind is not raised) falls below the 1600mm mark when the blind is fully raised.
    Also ensure that the warning labels are present on each internal corded window furnishing, as many people tear them off.