Any dirt bike riders here?

Discussion in 'Living Room' started by robbie_p, 28th May, 2020.

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  1. robbie_p

    robbie_p Well-Known Member

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    22nd Jun, 2015
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    Hi All,

    I am looking to learn to drive a motor bike with the main purpose of dirt biking. We are often camping in the national parks and being able to explore a little on a bike is something im looking to do.

    I understand that being able to drive a bike (legally) in the national parks requires you to follow the same rules of the road (in terms if licensing), so my plan is as follows:

    1: Complete a Q-Ride pre-learner course
    2: Complete the motorcycle knowledge test

    Once i have the above, i should be able to practice riding with another fully licenced rider.

    With the above in mind, what would be a good entry level "lams" dirt bike to learn with? (I obviously dont want to spend too much).

    Also, for a learner looking to get a dirt bike, should I look at something that can be used on the roads too as ill get more opportunities to practice on the roads compared to in the national parks.


    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers,
    Robbie
     
  2. bmc

    bmc Well-Known Member

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    G'day @robbie_p

    I have had numerous dirt bikes over the years, from 80cc up to 650cc.
    My current bike is a Suzuki DRZ400E. (reliable, enough power for the tracks and road, low maintenance, does everything OK)

    As it sounds like it's your first bike, my suggestion would be a road/trail bike. Something in the 250-300 range until you gain some confidence and more experience.
    Although it's a little undersized if you propose riding large distances on the road, the 250 is adequate for dirt trails.
    there is never a perfect bike, it’s always a compromise.
    Don't let testosterone sway you towards a larger bike, it's going to be heavier and way too much power for you while learning.
    maybe have a look at a Yamaha WR250, great alround bike and best bang for your buck.

    and don't skimp on your protective gear because you are going to come off.

    there's only 2 types of dirt bike riders,
    - those that have come off,
    - and those that are about to.
     
  3. robbie_p

    robbie_p Well-Known Member

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    Thanks @bmc ! Much appreciated.

    I'll see if i can find a WR250 at a decent price. Was hoping to keep it around $5k.

    The end goal is to be riding in the national parks, however, i will do small rides on the road purely to lean to ride. I'll be get more opportunities to learn on the roads than tracks, but my road rides will be very short.

    That said, would i need to change the tyres (on anything else) when riding on the road?
     
  4. Antoni0

    Antoni0 Well-Known Member

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    So true, speaking from experience Lol!
     
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  5. bmc

    bmc Well-Known Member

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    for short rides on the road the standard knobby tires will be ok. there are other crossover tyres but remember it's all about compromise. you either set the bike up for 80% road - 20% dirt or vise versa. Some blokes will have two sets of wheels on the ready for road or dirt. but i don't think you're near that stage................ (yet)

    take care in the wet though, knobbys can be slippery on the bitumen, also dirt bike brakes are a little less powerful than road bikes for obvious reasons. (designed for different speeds and different surfaces)

    handling a bike on the dirt is a different discipline to the road. you will find your zone, ride with a buddy and watch for 4WD's coming from the other way. people seem to lose their minds in the bush and don't think of road rules.

    (geez i sound like my dad)
     
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  6. Rolf Latham

    Rolf Latham Inciteful (sic) Staff Member Business Plus Member

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    Im a wanna be

    Spent a lot of time on a Ag 100 :) but those things are dangerous

    ta
    rolf
     
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  7. Icarus

    Icarus Well-Known Member

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    You've just gone up another rung on my ladder Rolf! I still have an AG100 and AG200 sitting in the shed here. Great learner bikes!

    robbie_p - what bikes have you ridden in the past and how tall are you? Either the WR250, DRZ250, KXF250, CFR250L/X, KTM 250EXE etc. options would suit. You'll be able to pick up something decent in your budget of $5k.

    If you're a little shorter in stature, you can pick up an AG (agricultural) bike very cheaply - and flog it off again for a similar price later on, even with a couple of extra dings on it. They are solid, (ok, very heavy) and geared down - so not a rocket and helpful when gaining confidence. I had a Kawasaki Stockman and Suzuki Trojan for a while too, they're comparable to the Aggies.
    Your mates will laugh at you, but you'll be the one with the last laugh when you get up the monstrous hill, and they're still stuck at the bottom...

    Lots of great camping/ride spots around Brissie region. I recommend Mount Mee and Gherulla on the northside - and of course, Glasshouse.

    I had dual sport tyres on my G450x, but they were useless on dirt and even worse on wet bitumen, not terrible when it's dry. If you're planning to spend more time on the dirt, just stick with the stock tyres, at least they'll be road legal.

    Have fun, and see you out on the dirt one day.