1930’s Queenslander - raise, re-stump, frame + clad lower level

Discussion in 'Renovation & Home Improvement' started by JennaL, 11th Dec, 2019.

Join Australia's most dynamic and respected property investment community
  1. JennaL

    JennaL Member

    Joined:
    24th Mar, 2019
    Posts:
    6
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Hi everyone, we’re in the initial planning stages of the project to raise our house. It’s a 1930’s porch and gable style Queenslander in Holland Park, with a decent front to back slope (approx 2000mm over the existing footprint) which is concreted underneath.

    We are looking at various options and builders to work with to have the first 3 stages completed.

    Stage 1 - raise, 1000-1500mm to bring the existing entry up to street level and create a 2700-3000mm lower level, potential slide to the right of 400-500mm (pending builders suggestion and council approval) new steel stumps, pool excavation, concrete slab (including driveway and path) new roof and guttering, plumbing and drainage for future works.

    Stage 2 - Frame perimeter of lower level, include doors and windows, clad walls.

    Stage 3 - minimal alterations to upstairs, new internal stairs, new external stairs x 2.

    NOT to be completed;

    Stage 4 - this would be the progressive fit out of the lower level

    Landscaping
    Painting
    Kitchen
    Bathrooms
    No lining of walls or flooring

    Downstairs would pretty much be a shell at the handover point. However, plans would include all services for plumbing and drainage, in order to have this completed in the initial stages.

    There is a stormwater easement over the back fence (part of a newer development) so, hopeful that this already has an available tie-in for any stormwater/pool drainage requirements.

    ***Looking for any suggestions or help regarding the budgeting, also contractors to use for the work***

    Current rough estimates are as follows;

    Raise, excavate, re-stump, concreting, drainage, plumbing, framing, cladding, extension of roofline to cover the existing deck, internal and external stairs, rectification of enclosed front verandah (reinstate original facade) all the essentials for the house to look completed from the street and be suitable enough to live in while completing the lower level, and then progressively renovate the top level. Disconnections and reconnections of services etc included in this $120-$130k

    New roof and guttering $20-25k

    Pool - excavation and installation $30k - possible saving a small amount here with combining the excavation work.

    I realise I’ve combined the stages a bit in the estimates above, but this is how we have been quoted so far. If anyone has a good breakdown of costs that they’re happy to share, that would be much appreciated.

    Looking for anyone with local or relevant experience completing this type of renovation more recently, any suggestions on estimates or areas to consider for cost savings would be great!

    We plan on creating an extensive spreadsheet of estimates, quotes and actual costs when we get started and will be sharing this down the track to help others

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    7,152
    Location:
    Brisbane
    We've just done this as part of a larger development. We initially wanted to build down into the lower level and create two level houses but we had two to do and we needed that money for other things, so we limited it to raising, repositioning, battening in and reconnecting services, new kitchen and bathroom, refinish floors, painting, new roof.

    Because the next owner will likely build down into the lower level, we chose to add new front stairs and no back stairs. We had the lower level plans drawn but the designer said many people plan the lower level and don't build it, and plumbing put into the slab often ends up needing to be changed if the next owner changes things, so we did a slab for a vehicle and left the rest gravel so next owner can design their own layout and not dig up our plumbing if it is different.

    Our ballpark figure from probably three years ago now was $90k (I think that included slab) so your figure sounds roughly ok to me. Your roofing figure sounds ok too.

    We would have engaged a house raiser ourselves, but ours was part of a DA (larger development) so we decided to give it to McAndrews Developments (found via this forum) to manage the whole thing.

    That was the best move we made. We're dealing with Matt Mcandrew 0410 481 703 and he's one of the nicest people we've dealt with.
     
    fols, ellejay, Sackie and 1 other person like this.
  3. JennaL

    JennaL Member

    Joined:
    24th Mar, 2019
    Posts:
    6
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Thanks for that info :) where was your development? I’ll get in touch with Matt and see if he is interested in quoting for our project. Thanks again!
     
  4. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    7,152
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Ours project is in Coorparoo.
     
    Last edited: 11th Dec, 2019
    JennaL likes this.
  5. ORAC

    ORAC Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    1st Mar, 2016
    Posts:
    143
    Location:
    Brisbane
    If your picture for your ID is your house, then it is similar to my own PPOR I did a few years ago, it was a lift-up, big extension, and total renovation inside (i.e. strip back and re-do) - it was a big job. Some things to be aware of from this experience:

    1. If your property is pre-1946 it is likely to be TBC (Traditional Building Character) and will likely need a DA (Development Approval) before any alteration can be done. You should consult a Town Planner for advice, apart from Town Planning fees, a site survey would be required and plans for what the final result would be (you may also need a Building Designer or Architect). Even when lifted, you need the Surveyor to confirm the height and certify it. There's is planning and professional services that you may need. Always good to get some Builders to quote / give an appraisal and ask what's included. Please check.

    2. Most older Queenslanders have asbestos sheeting in them, and hence you may need (or should) get an assessment on the asbestos contained and whether the works you anticipate are a hazard and require treatment. When I did my reno there was a lot of asbestos, especially downstairs underneath the house where the laundry was.

    3. For the raising, need to also check if additional structural steel is required to add integrity to the house. As it is lifted-up the nature of the house changes. Check with the proposed house raising company, architect and/or structural engineer, or builder.

    4. Whilst contemplating stages, it's best to get plans drawn up for final result and intermediate stages, whilst you think you don't want to change upstairs of the existing house, need to consider the stairs and general flow of the house and how it would work for you, not surprised if later on, you want some changes. Note that a new front stair case would be required. Even lifting up with the new pool - how does the existing house relate to the pool area?, are you going to have a bottom deck?, is it timber or concrete?, what type of access would you consider?, where would you put the laundry etc. Things change, hence consultation with a Building Designer or Architect or Builder might be good.

    5. To reduce some initial cost, for downstairs, you could batten out around the perimeter of the house, and do the completion of downstairs later.

    6. In terms of cost, think that your $120K - $130K could be a bit light, I think there will be other issues / costs that prop up and allow extra contingency to be safe. For example, professional services above, maybe electrical / plumbing to bring up to code, any asbestos issues, etc. Renovating Queenslanders is not cheap.

    Any other queries, please PM me. Hope this helps.
     
    Sackie, willair, ellejay and 2 others like this.
  6. JennaL

    JennaL Member

    Joined:
    24th Mar, 2019
    Posts:
    6
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Hi there,

    thanks for taking the time to include so much information in your reply,

    1. The house is the one in my profile photo what area was yours in? As ours is a 1930’s build and in the TBC, I have already spoken with council and a town planner regarding the requirements.

    2. Yes, asbestos. We do think there will be a small amount, but I didn’t think about the laundry area. Thanks for highlighting this one.

    3. We plan on engaging a reputable qualified builder, I am sure they will point us in the right direction with regards to steel. But would be good to know if there is a general rule of thumb when it comes to open plan areas and the need for steel?

    4. we plan on completing the entire lower level floor plan, and building to accommodate this. As much as I’ve said we will not fit this out initially, we will engage contractors along the way to progressively finish it, once we have moved in and got the initial bill out of the way. So all wet areas etc will be mapped and thought out with the builder and Drafty/ Architect. Thanks for highlighting a few key points, I’m going to use this forum to create a checklist for when discussing with the builder.

    5. We considered this, but want to be able to fit it out in our own time. So think it’s worthwhile to spend this money enclosing it now.

    6. thanks for your input. I’ll pm you soon with a few more details and questions.

    have a great weekend!
     
  7. willair

    willair Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    19th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    4,509
    Location:
    ..Nimbin Caravan Park...
    Some people i know have used the link below and cost wise they would be in the high range but they have been around a long time..
    Also as long as that power-line does not cross into next doors foot print with the lift then you will not have to move the outside supply post will can bump up the budget a few percent ..good luck..
    Custom Home Builders Brisbane – Renovations & New Luxury House Builds
    imho..
     
  8. wylie

    wylie Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    7,152
    Location:
    Brisbane
    And if it does, as happened in our project, we copped a $13k bill to install a new power pole on the footpath for our neighbour's power feed in.

    We couldn't move our house until this was done and it took about nine weeks to sort out from memory. Thankfully it was addressed as part of our DA because if not already signed off, we had to wait for the neighbour (doesn't live there, rental IP) to come home from overseas and look at it herself. Had she said "no" we faced having to go to court, and possibly $40k (from memory) in legal fees, and goodness knows how much more time wasted, to move ahead.

    This is a development I'd considered project managing myself. I'm so glad I didn't. We just fielded the calls from our project manager and made some decisions. He did all the hard work and copped most of the grey hairs.
     
    Last edited: 15th Dec, 2019
    Sackie, JennaL and willair like this.
  9. willair

    willair Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    19th Jun, 2015
    Posts:
    4,509
    Location:
    ..Nimbin Caravan Park...
    When you look at the power-pole for a start ,then bring the plumbing up too the new codes the same as the elec's which may may well have to be fully rewired new boards ect those three alone can add a very high %into the costs ..excellent area location ..imho..
     
    JennaL likes this.
  10. JennaL

    JennaL Member

    Joined:
    24th Mar, 2019
    Posts:
    6
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Thanks for your reply. I’m not sure exactly what you mean about “footprint”. Is this the house footprint? Or their property boundary?

    Thanks
     
  11. JennaL

    JennaL Member

    Joined:
    24th Mar, 2019
    Posts:
    6
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Switchboard and wiring are all compliant, so no real concerns there